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StoneprintJournal.blog

Structuralist anthropology blog by Edmond Furter

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subconscious

Ambrose and Atlantia’s tree of subconscious connections

Kuba Ambrose and Vera Atlantia's Rainbow tribe artwork of ayahuasca or DMT trancers in Eden, expresses two concentric cycles of characters, with their eyes on two axial grids, nested in one another. This subconscious expression of archetype is rich in semantic (contextual), semiotic (core meaning) and spatial connections and coherence; for which it sacrifices some individual differentiation among the characters. Archetype guides natural, inherent order in all art styles; in built sites; and in several other media once thought to have been 'invented' or 'developed' or 'evolved'. Culture re-expresses natural structure.

The stoneprint tour of Paris

Social groups always re-express a specific structure in every complex building site, including villages, temple fields, campuses and cities. Known elements of the archetypal structure of culture include some of their characteristic features; their peripheral sequence; and spacing of communal... Continue Reading →

Architecture reveals our subconscious building code

Our huts, houses, kivas, circles, pillars, fortune bowls, art, game boards, temples, pyramids, cities, constellations, geoglyphs and graves, say much more about us that we ever knew. Structuralist analysis reveals the universal repertoire in our subconscious behaviour.

Art design re-expresses innate structure

The building blocks of culture are the five abstract layers, like the building blocks of nature are elements, their properties, combinations, and reactions; from indestructible electrons to fragile self-replicating creatures. Our replications or ‘creations’ are equally over-determined.

Cape Town’s Dutch forts made an innate imprint

Cape of Good hope early Dutch settlement, later named Cape Town (after Lloydthomas.org. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by Edmond Furter). A Dutch harbour, water source, and vegetable garden on the sea route to India, soon grew into Cape of Good... Continue Reading →

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