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Archetypal structure in religious art

Gruber’s Bad Teinach art integrates astrology, alchemy, kabbalah, culture and cult

The Bad Teinach mineral hot springs resort church Baroque altarpiece, is one of the largest, most complex and most integrated visual manifestos of counter-reformation mystical Roman Catholic Christianity. The work is densely packed with Biblical, alchemical, astrological and kabbalistic imagery, integrated into the usual layer of political and social aspirations. This collaborative design was commissioned by Princess Antonia’s circle of religious and academic advisors, painted by Johann Friedrich Gruber, court painter at Stuttgart in 1659 -1663, and installed 1673. Its designs now present an opportunity to test the structuralist art analysis axial grid model, based on the anthropology of Claude Levi-Strauss; and the psychology of Carl Jung; and the philosophical concept of archetype, as a pre-existent potential that guides natural and cultural expressions by subconscious inspiration. Triptychs have three views, perhaps analogous to the three planes of time and space and time (see polar triangles in the axial grids below).

Demonstration of a universal, subconscious standard structure in all complex art, and in some other cultural media (particularly myth and ritual) of all cultures and eras, from extant Ice Age art to contemporary art, challenges the conscious paradigm of all the human sciences. The triptych in Bad Teinach, in the Black Forest, was designed as a visual manifesto of counter-reformation mystical Roman Catholic Christianity. The design is a Kabbalistic teaching board, six metres tall, dominating the small church interior. Gruber was court painter at Stuttgart. Antonia’s brother, Duke Eberhard, had established the church as a private family chapel, partly to house the artwork. The family took summer holidays in the bath town.

Royal patronage of esoteric philosophy, or scientific mysticism, was first recorded under kings Ur Nanshe and Gudea in Sumeria (Furter 2016); and was also prominent in the politics of medieval Italy and Renaissance Europe. Conscious and subconscious agendas in all cultural media perpetually divide economies, religions, and culture into stylistic differences. In addition, mainstream culture always fractures into craftic counter-cults. Gnosticism and Sufism remain distinct cults in Christianity and Islam. Speculative Masonry and other cults perpetually attempt vertical integration, but religion and crafts remain as repellent as science and esoterica.

While alchemy was developing into science, its labels, tables and formulae became conscious technology and academia, while its correspondence theories retained popular currency, notoriety, and at times suppression. The esoteric or Gnostic motto that Phil Norfleet cites about the Bad Teinach artwork, acquires new meaning in the context of subconscious expression: “It is the glory of God to conceal a thing, but the honour of kings to search out such a matter,” after Proverbs 25;2.

Gruber’s Bad Teinach triptych covers and case (after Esoterik Astrologiedhs de). See the subconscious archetype imprint in its Bridal procession; and three interlocking imprints in in its interior central panel; and the imprint in its interior wings, in the structuralist analyses below.

Princess Antonia of Wurttenberg, her sisters, and the women of Bad Teinach, were mainly widows after the Thirty years’ War. They embraced charitable and esoteric causes. Under its integrated layers of Judaeo-Christian, alchemical, astronomical and kabbalistic symbolism, the Bad Teinach altarpiece subconsciously expresses four sets of the universal standard ‘grammar’ or ‘DNA’ of art; three of these are stacked vertically in the central panel. Each cycle includes the sixteen archetypes; in their standard semi-circular sequence; with the eyes of typological characters on an axial grid connecting the pairs of opposites; and with the usual tri-polar structure of two mirrored triangles on five points, marked by certain limb joints. This subconscious structure, rigorous as usual, confirms that the core content of any complex artwork is standard; and that five layers of structure, and about 60% of 100 known optional recurrent features, are predictable in cultural works from any place and time. The same applies to rock art, modern art, and future artworks.

The structure of expression, and mechanisms of culture, is not an idle game. These features also appear in natural media, and thus in archetype. They reveal the structure of meaning itself, and offer a unique opportunity to raise subconscious behaviour to conscious study. On consciousness, Jung noted: “Without the existence of conscious concepts, perception is impossible. This explains numerous neurotic disturbances which arise when certain contents are constellated in the unconscious [named subconscious in the present study]; but cannot be assimilated, owing to the lack of perceptive concepts that would grasp them. It is extremely important to tell children fairy-tales and legends, and to inculcate religious ideas and dogmas into adults, because these things are instrumental symbols with whose help unconscious contents can be canalized into consciousness, interpreted, and integrated. Failing this, their energy flows off into unconscious contents which, normally, are not much emphasized, and intensifies them to pathological proportions. We then get apparently groundless phobias and obsessions; crazes, idiosyncrasies, hypochondriac ideas, and intellectual perversions, camouflaged in social, religious, or political garb”.

Alchemists always have an intuitive grasp of the need to study the inherent structure of nature and culture, as they did before psychology was a science or even a word. Freud and Jung brought the eternal craft of spiritual therapy into science, where it lives uncomfortably close to secular chemical medicine. The Bad Teinach altarpiece, alchemy, astrology and kabbalah all seem distant from the conscious crafts of philosophy, self-improvement and scientific culture today. However the periodic table, at the root of chemistry, physics and medicine; and the standard model of physics (Furter 2016), are fruits of structuralism.

The structure of expression and perception, though camouflaged among our conscious obsessions, is more consistent than conventional symbolic features, such as vague correspondences between gods, stock characters, ritual gestures, devices, planets, constellations and colours. Subconscious expression never co-incides with conscious designs (as their different ‘perspective’ centres confirm). Expression usually partially confirms, and partially contradicts the conscious symbolism in artistic ‘programmes’ such as religious texts, alchemical stages, planets, and kabbalistic sephirot tableau.

In the alchemical work titled ‘Cabala as mirror of art and nature’ (Furter 2014) is an astrological cycle and a planetary cycle; both entirely contradicted by the artist’s subconscious expression. In Poussin’s Helios and Phaeton, his subconscious expression entirely contradicts an astrological band, which is mere decoration (Furter 2014). Most alchemists are artists rather than chemists; and most artists are not philosophers or esotericists. Culture operates on two distinct levels of consciousness, confirming some of the findings of Carl Jung regarding archetype (after Plato and others) in our psychic motivations. Structuralist analysis of artworks and built sites (Furter 2016) confirm some of the findings of Claude Levi-Strauss regarding our innate tendency to isolate elements of experience into natural categories. But the structure of perception and expression is now revealed to be much more detailed than Plato, Jung, or Levi-Strauss found. The combination of simplistic features (bent forward, or arms up, or juvenile, and so on); and complexity of combination of features (optionality, sequence, eye position, axial grid, relative orientation of polar elements), indicate that our subconscious mind ‘sees and speaks’ in natural categories of archetypal meaning; and is much better at spatial composition than our conscious minds could be.

The eye-hand-mind co-ordination of artists, including recognised masters, gifted amateurs, and unknown rock art masters, is an instrument for archetypal expression. Isolation of layers of rigorous recurrent features in cultural media, raise the need for a more comprehensive form of art analysis, terminology, and definitions of what art and culture is.

Princess Antonia and her advisors had made a fine art of esoteric crafts, at a more intuitive level than science. Art history, anthropology, psychology, sociology and the other humanities now has a model to isolate categorical archetypal core content, from ambiguous symbols, and from superfluous styling. A provisional scoring system to test the quality of structural art analysis, confirm that about 60% of the claims made about the hidden structure of artworks, are usually correct. Analysis scores range between 40% and 80%, or 40% variance, on a sigma curve. Scoring indicates only the quality of analysis, not the quality of artworks. Some works are remarkable for containing two, or three (as in the Bad Teinach central panel), or even four adjacent and interlocking mindprints.

Archetype in the Bad Teinach Philosopher’s garden foreground

The Bad Teinach altarpiece central panel bottom register, or foreground, pictures a Philosopher’s garden, with twelve sons of Jacob as patriarchs of twelve tribes; below some prophets at the allegorical college building. The caption below reports the underlying archetype, in the standard structuralist axial grid model and labelling format, here adding subconscious astrological analogues to the generic type names.

Structuralist analysis of the triple imprint in the Reformation Bad Teinach altarpiece triptych by Gruber, for princess Antonia’s church.

Type Number, Label, Decan; Garden character (noting archetypal features):

1 Builder or Taurus; Prophet Isaiah, as Rosicrucian leader Andreae (hero), in the mountain (cave) gate, with cup (rain), crown, scroll (book), spear (former spring marker).

2 Builder or Taurus; Prophet Ezekiel (hero) in the mountain (cave) gate, with survey plan (book), trumpet (thunder) and skeleton (more typical of 13).

2c Basket or Algol; Sephiroth’s Glory (instrument, secret, school).

3 Queen or Aries; Sephirothic (school) Glory as a woman (queen), golden statue.

4 KingA or Pisces; Statue of Joseph (furnace) dreamer, at the right corner (rectangle).

4 KingB or Pisces; Christ (king, sun, ‘twin’ of John) on throne (squat, rectangle).

4 KingC or Pisces; John Baptist (‘twin’ of Christ. More typical of 5).

5a Priest or Aquarius; Healing snake (reptile) of Moses (priest) on a cross. And Moon (water) priestess (priest, assembly) half-cloaked (sash. See Tarot trump 21, World; 21 is a magnitude of 5 in base-8 with two fives).

5b PriestA or Aquarius; Sephirothic Eternity (assembly?), in green and brown (varicoloured), axis to his chest (heart, of 13 opposite).

5b PriestB or Aquarius; Statue of Joshua (judge), at the left corner, axis to chest (heart, of 13 opposite).

5c Basket Tail or Piscis Austrinus; A prophet, in prayer, with scroll (weave, reveal. See also the Heaven register), on a phoenix or dragon (tail).

6 Exile or Capricornus; A prophet, in the field gate, with scroll and oracle pot (sacrifice, U-shape).

7 ChildA or Sagittarius; Evangelist with eagle.

7 ChildB or Sagittarius; Evangelist with angel’s (juvenile) head (beheaded, manifesting).

7g Galactic Centre; Agave flower on stem, hemp plant for making rope (rope).

8 Healer or Scorpius; Tribe Naphatli’s antler hind deer (trance. See Tarot trump 9, Hermit with antler, or wearing antlers), with cornucopia (heal) on a tree stump (pillar).

9 Healer or Scorpius; Tribe Dan, with scales (of 10), with sword (strong), serpent (snake, heal) at his feet.

9c Basket Lid or Serpens; Dan’s serpent (snake, reveal).

10 Teacher or Libra; Tribe Asher, prosperous (trade), shoes of iron and brass (metal, trade), linked to Phoenicia; one arm up (arm-up), a baker holding wheat (more typical of 11), near the gate (guard).

11 Womb or Virgo; Asher’s midriff (‘womb’), with bread? (wheat?)

11 Womb or VirgoB; Ewe’s midriff (womb).

11 Womb or VirgoC; Princess Antonia’s midriff (womb), as virtue (virginity) in the gate (interior).

12 Heart or Leo; Tribe Zebulon, ‘Of single heart (heart), no double heart (IChron12:33), ‘Fully armed’ (weapons); ‘Fought (war) at Merom to death (death)(Judges5:18); his axis to his chest (heart), with anchor (weapon, more often scythe).

13 HeartA or Leo; Tribe Judah, axis to his chest (heart), with lion (felid), sword (weapon).

13 HeartB or Leo; Tribe Issachar (of 14), axis to his chest (heart), with ass (of 14) and globe (summer?).

13c Basket Head or Leo Minor; Tribe Ruben, with shield (lid), near the centre (ingress, of 14).

14 Mixer or Cancer; Tribe Simeon, with two staffs (more typical of 9/10), wolf (canid, also of 9/10), near the centre (ingress).

15 MakerA or Gemini; Evangelist with a bull (more typical of 1 adjacent).

15 MakerB or Gemini; Evangelist with a lion (rampant. More typical of 13). Two types 15 (doubled), hold bull and lion (churn, order).

15g Gate; City gate (path, juncture).

 

Axial centre; Moon water font edge (juncture).

4p Galactic South Pole; Christ’s foot (limb-joint).

11p Galactic Pole; Central Christ’s elbow (limb-joint) at his cross. And Princess Antonia’s dismembered heart in her hand (limb-joint).

Summer or Celestial Pole (cp); Luna’s knee (limb-joint), horizontal to the axial centre. Theses markers place summer on axis 15 or Gemini, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Pisces. The top central position of type 4 or Pisces, as Christ, and as John, confirm the time-frame.

A general theme in the garden register is type 4 King; typical of rectangle (here flower-beds); garden (see Tarot trump 19, Sun over a walled garden. A higher magnitude of 4 in base-8 with two types 5, is 19); furnace (college as alchemical furnace); and twins (axes 4v11, 5a v13, 6v14, and 7v15 are all doubled here). All five layers of structural expression are subconscious to artists, and members of any culture.

The analysis score in the garden register is 57/68 archetypal features; 26/16 axial points (excessive scores are accounted, usually neutralised by off-grid characters); 10/4 c-type sector features; 2/2 g-gate sector features; 3/5 polar markers; 2/2 planar or cardinal orientations; 1/1 correlation with the Age or Age prior to the work; 2/2 general themes; thus 103/100, minus 11 extra characters off the axial grid; total 92%, one of the highest scores found among about 750 analyses.

Archetype in the Bad Teinach Philosopher’s college building

The Bad Teinach altarpiece central panel middle register pictures a philosopher’s college. The list below gives the underlying archetype in the standard structuralist axial grid model and labelling format, adding subconscious astrological analogues.

Structuralist analysis of the triple imprint in the Reformation Bad Teinach altarpiece triptych by Gruber, for princess Antonia’s church.

Type Number, Label, Decan; College character (noting archetypal features):

01 Builder or Taurus; OFF THE GRID Golden ibis at an obelisk.

02 Builder or Taurus; Evangelist with lion (monster) and book (book).

02c Basket; A prophet in the city gate, with cup (container) and scroll (book, texture).

03 Queen Aries; A prophet with jug (sacrifice), a plan (book, of adjacent 2), and a scroll (school), head inclined (neck bent).

04 KingA or Pisces; Statue of Joseph? (sun?), at the hall right corner (rectangle), paired with Joshua (‘twin’).

04 KingB or Pisces; Right crucifix (‘king’), paired with another (twin).

05a Priest or Aquarius; Aaron (priest) at an altar (assembly) recalling golden calf (bovid, hyperactive).

05b PriestA or Aquarius; Left crucifix, axis to its chest (heart, of 13 opposite), of snake (reptile).

05b PriestB or Aquarius; Statue of Joshua? (war, or 13 opposite), as cup-bearer (decan Aquarius, rare; water); at the hall left corner.

05c Basket Tail; Wall engraving (texture) of Queen Sheba (exile, of 6) of incense and myrrh (tree).

06 Exile or Capricornus; A prophet in the field gate, scroll, divination pot (sacrifice, U-shape), sextant (triangle).

07 Child or Sagittarius; Tabernacle of cloth (bag, rope, unfold), formerly Ark of Covenant (chariot?), later empty (eyeless).

07g Galactic Centre; Mt Sinai base (path, juncture).

08 Healer or Scorpius; OFF THE GRID Peacock bent forward, at obelisk. And engraving of Daniel in furnace.

09 Healer or Scorpius; St Michael in battle (strong) over Mt Sinai (pillar?).

09c Basket Lid; Angel with trumpet (instrument, metal, reveal, enforce, armlink). And Phoenix  in nest (weave, disc) on obelisk (pillar).

10 Teacher or Libra; Justice (of 10 or 11), shield, sword (metal), arms up (arms up), at dome (disc) among procession (carousel).

11 WombB or Virgo; Love or Sephirothic Beauty’s midriff (womb).

11 WombA or Virgo; Mercy’s midriff (womb), at engraving of annunciation of her pregnancy (womb).

12 Heart or Leo; Blue angel (angel) with harp, axis to his chest (heart).

13 HeartA or Leo; Crane, axis to its chest (heart), with ? (weapon?), on spire of element water (water-work).

13 HeartB or Leo; Angel (angel) with trumpet (of 5 opposite), of heaven (death).

13c Basket Head; Halo (hat, lid, head) of secret book (time, oracle).

14 Mixer or Cancer; Microcosm of God’s secret book (time), near the centre (ingress).

15 Maker or Gemini; Angel (winged) with Gospel (order, book of 1) and wand (sceptre). And (doubled) angel (winged) with millstone (churn).

15g Gate; Zion city gate (path, juncture), under God’s microcosm (juncture).

 

Axial centre; Patriarch Jacob’s throne.

4p Galactic South Pole; Crucifix hand (limb joint)

11p Galactic Pole; Beauty’s foot (limb joint)

Summer; Pillar Jacin. Midwinter; Carved phoenix tail (limb joint). The horizontal plane confirms the summer marker between axes 15-1 or Gemini-Taurus, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Pisces-Aquarius. However the vertical plane of the axial centre is in Pisces-Virgo, with Christ and St John as types 4 or Pisces, confirming and Age Pisces spring.

A general theme in the central or college building’s register, is type 11 Womb; typical of gestation, domes or furnaces. Six women are on the lintel and facade, and two of these express type 11 Virgo, with prominent wombs on the axial grid; and one also expressing 11 in the upper register mindprint. All five layers of structuralist expression are subconscious to artists and members of any culture.

The analysis score in the mid register is 47/68 archetypal features; 18/16 axial points; 18/4 c-type sector features; 5/2 g-gate sector features; 3/5 polar markers; 1/2 planar or cardinal orientations; 1/1 correlation with the Age, or Age prior to the work; 2/2 general themes; thus 95/100, minus 8 extra characters off the axial grid; total 87%, above the top of the average range.

Archetype in the Bad Teinach Heaven register

The Bad Teinach altarpiece central panel top register pictures Heaven. The list below gives the underlying archetype in the standard structuralist axial grid model and labelling format, adding subconscious astrological analogues.

Structuralist analysis of the triple imprint in the Reformation Bad Teinach altarpiece triptych by Gruber, for princess Antonia’s church.

Type Number, Label, Decan; Heaven character (noting archetypal features):

01 Builder or Taurus; Wind angel, flying (twist, bird).

02 Builder or Taurus; Praise angel playing violin (twist).

03 Queen or Aries; Cherub in green.

04 King or Pisces; Yod letter on sephirot Crown (king. See Tarot trump 4, Emperor).

05a Priest or Aquarius; Cherub (winged) in red (colours, sash).

05b Priest or Aquarius; High order angel (winged), multi-winged (hyperactive, large).

05c Basket Tail; Cherub flying (horizontal, of 5), off the grid, as most c-types are.

06 Exile or Capricornus; Angel with long scroll (of 5c), far from the centre (egress).

07 Child or Sagittarius; Cherub (juvenile).

07g Galactic Centre; Golden angel sitting. And sun on dome top.

08 Healer or Scorpius; Cherub with palm branch, diving (bent forward).

09 Healer or Scorpius; Daniel’s giant (strong, large) of steel (metal) with sword, at obelisk (pillar) of fire (smelt).

09c Basket Lid; Holy Spirit (reveal). And dome (lid, metal) with engravings (texture). And Ezekiel’s four throne angels (instrument). And Justice (of 10/11) with shield, sword (metal), arms up (of 10), among procession (carousel).

10 Teacher or Libra; God?, arms up (arms), central (balance), in a trio (polar function), central on the dome (disc, guard, carousel), under the crown of God (metal), flanked by crowns of Holy Spirit and Son (council).

11 Womb or Virgo; Mercy’s midriff (womb).

12 Heart or Leo; Cherub (angel) with palm branch (scythe shape), diving (invert).

13 Heart or Leo; Praise angel (angel) with harp, axis to his chest (heart).

13c Basket Head; Crane (oracle) with ? (weapon? Of 13) in nest (weave), on spire of element water (water-work).

14 Mixer or Cancer; Mt Zion base, eternal (time), tree-shaped (tree. See alchemical arbores), far from the centre (egress).

15 Maker or Gemini; Red angel (winged) with lute.

15g Gate; Green angel. And red angel (doubled, of 15), smiting (smite).

 

Axial; Unmarked, near Enoch.

4p Galactic South Pole; God’s monogram, A/V (juncture).

11p Galactic Pole; Angel’s foot (limb-joint), on the dome (juncture).

Summer; Unmarked, near the burning bush of Moses, horizontal from the centre. This marker places summer on axis 15 or Gemini, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Pisces, confirming the other two registers. The top central crown as type 4 King or Pisces, confirms the time-frame.

A general theme in the heaven register is type 10 Teacher (here God the Father), typical of balance, elements, cycles, wheels (here the central rosette under type 10). All five layers of structural expression are subconscious to artists, and members of any culture.

The analysis score in the heaven sector is 34/68 archetypal features; 16/16 axial points; 12/4 c-type sector features; 2/2 g-gate sector features; 2/5 polar markers; 1/2 planar or cardinal orientations; 1/1 correlation with the Age, or Age prior to the work; 3/2 general themes; thus 71/100, minus11 extra characters off the axial grid; total 60%, on the universal average, despite some conscious and subconscious compromises with competing programmatic elements; perhaps compensated for by baroque opulence.

Archetype in the Bad Teinach triptych Egypt and Moses wings

The Bad Teinach altarpiece triptych wings interiors picture the holy family’s Flight to Egypt with baby Christ; and an Egyptian princess finding baby Moses in the Nile. Some scholars (Rohl 2007) see Abraham as an Egyptian pharaoh; and Christ’s foster father Joseph’s name as more than coincidence, since prophet Joseph was vizier or acting prince of Egypt; and had invited his estranged family to visit, perhaps to stay in the Nile Delta. Some see Moses and the Exodus as Egyptian royal and Akhenaton priestly exiles; Jewish Testament books as hiding their Egyptian legacy from Babylonian masters; Christ as Egyptian royal descendant in exile; the New Testament as hiding this Egyptian legacy from Rome; and the Flight to Egypt as a futile attempt to seek asylum with estranged family. Renaissance scholars and astrologers were familiar with Egyptian esoterica, thus the triptych wings may have consciously intended to integrate Biblical history into this religious, cultural and artistic manifesto.

The two wing panels are fixed further apart than shown here, but they form a standard archetypal cycle and axial grid when spaced moderately, indicating that they were designed on one surface. General themes in this design include type 6 Exile, typical of egress (here of a design split into flanking panels); sacrifice (baby in basket, and baby escaping Heroid’s genocide but destined for crucifixion), small (babies), tree (in both panels); and its axial opposite, type 14 Mixer, of egress, time (here similar episodes in the era of Abraham, Moses and Christ), transform (virgin to mother). Another general theme here is the four transitional or ‘Basket’ fields, 2c v9c and 5c v13c; typical of woven texture (here the basket, reeds, trees, lamp glass); container (basket, lamp); secret (identity of the child, or of the parents, hidden in oracles). The list below notes features of the underlying archetype in the standard structuralist axial grid model and labelling format, adding subconscious astrological analogues.

Gruber; Bad Teinach altar triptych wings interiors picture Christ’s family’s Flight to Egypt; and an Egyptian princess finding baby Moses in the Nile (archetype labels and axial grid by E Furter).

Type Number and Label; Egypt character (noting archetypal features):

1 Builder; OFF THE GRID Egyptian princess prefiguring Mary with courtiers (see Egyptian legacy notes above).

2 Builder; Egyptian slave (builder) gesturing (twist) from a tight group (cluster).

2c Basket; Princess’ cloak (weave, arm-link).

3 Queen; Egyptian queen (queen) at the Nile (pool).

4 King; PrincessB (twin?) kneeling (squat) with golden cloak, her right eye.

5a Priest; PrincessB with red hair (colour), golden cloak (sash), her left eye (tailcoat-head).

5c Basket Tail; Key (secret, container, reveal) of princess. And princess C with hat or braids (weave, disc) finding Moses (reveal).

6 Exile; Baby (small) Moses, far from the centre (egress) in a basket (U-shape, sacrifice), later pictured with ram’s (caprid) horns (horned).

7 Child; Donkey steed (chariot) with passenger (bag), child (juvenile), reins (rope); both eyes on the axial grid.

9 Healer; Joseph’s lamp (lamp, trance. See Tarot trump 9, Hermit with a lamp. Recurrent features arise from archetypal inspiration, rarely from learning or conspiracy).

9c Basket Lid; Lamp cover (disc, lid, instrument, reveal, metal) held by Joseph (arm-link).

10 Teacher; Joseph holding (arms up) lamp and staff (staff), with hat (disc), escort (guard) of Mary and Christ.

11 Womb; Mary’s midriff (womb).

12 Heart; Baby Christ’s chest (heart), descendant of David of Judah, lion (felid), destined to die young (death).

13c Basket Head; Christ as prophesied (oracle), with halo (hat, weave); off the grid as c-types usually are.

14 Mixer; Mary, virgin yet mother (transform).

15 Maker; Egyptian courtiers A and B (doubled), empire (order) and slave masters (mace, smite).

15g Gal.Gate; Egyptian courtier C.

 

Axial centre; On the left inner frame or cut-line (juncture).

4p Gal.S.Pole; Egyptian princess’ hip (limb-joint).

11p Gal.Pole; Mary’s elbow (limb-joint), not labelled here to avoid clutter.

Summer and winter; Probably on the left inner frame or cut-line (juncture), thus on the vertical plane, placing summer between axes 14-15 or Cancer-Gemini, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Aries-Pisces. Age Aries may be confirmed by the Egyptian queen on the right, who is uniquely shown in small perspective.

The analysis score in the two Bad Teinach wings is 34/68 archetypal features; 12/16 axial points; 14/4 c-type sector features; 0/2 g-gate sector features; 2/5 polar markers; 1/2 planar or cardinal orientations; 1/1 correlation with the Age, or Age prior to the work; 2/2 general themes; thus 66/100, minus 2 extra characters off the axial grid; total 64%, near the global average. Structuralist features of expression are universal, and subconscious to artists, architects, builders, crafters and members of any culture.

Archetype in the Bad Teinach Bridal procession

The Bad Teinach altarpiece triptych cover top two registers, picture a Bridal procession. The list below gives the underlying archetype in the standard structuralist axial grid model and labelling format, adding subconscious astrological analogues.

Gruber; Bad Teinach altar triptych cover top two registers of angels and Bridal procession (archetype labels and axial grid by E Furter).

Type Number, Label, Decan; Procession character (noting archetypal features):

1 Builder or Taurus; Golden angel musician in group (cluster) on scroll (book).

2 Builder or Taurus; Brown angel trumpeter (twist, cluster).

2c Basket or Algol; Two trumpets (instrument, arm-link).

3 Queen or Aries; Blue angel trumpeter.

4 King or Pisces; Purple angel beating two (twin) drums.

5a Priest or Aquarius; Tan angel (winged) trumpeter (trumpet. See Tarot trump 20, Judgement with trumpet; 20 is a magnitude of 5 in base-8) in group (assembly).

5b PriestA or Aquarius; Dark blue angel (winged) reclining (horizontal).

5b PriestB or Aquarius; Purple-orange (varicoloured) angel (winged), axis to his chest (heart, of 13 opposite), in group (assembly) at scroll (sash).

5c Basket Tail or Piscis Austrinus; Scroll (texture) part three (reveal). And woven (weave) vase (container). And door into heaven.

6 ExileA or Capricornus; Woman in red and blue, neck bent (more usual at 3), further from the centre (egress).

6 Exile or Child extra; OFF THE GRID Woman with apple and skull.

7 Child or Sagittarius; Women kneeling with two children (juvenile).

7g Gal.Centre;Child’s foot (limb-joint) on route (path) in cloud (water).

8 Healer or Scorpius; ChildB, squatting (bent forward).

9 Healer or Scorpius; Bridesmaid, sister Sybilla, named after an oracle (trance) in blue, inclining (bent forward), holding thorns or scourge (strength, ‘heal’).

9c Basket Lid or Lupus; Scourge (weave, instrument, enforce) and anchor (instrument, metal) held by women (arm-link).

10 Teacher or Libra; Bridesmaid (guard, council), sister Anna Johanna, holding up (arm up) an anchor (metal, market, ‘staff’).

11 Womb or Virgo; Princess Antonia’s midriff (womb), crowned (law) bride of Christ.

12 Heart or Leo; Princess Antonia’s chest (heart).

13 HeartA or Leo; Princess Antonia, bride of Christ of Judah or lion (felid),

13 HeartB or Leo; Christ of Judah or lion (felid) crowing Princess Antonia, carrying curved palm branch as scythe (weapon, death).

13c Basket Head; Scroll (oracle, weave) fist section (head).

14 Mixer or Cancer; Pink angel (angel) holding scroll.

15 Maker or Gemini; Red angel (winged) trumpeter.

 

Axial centre; Golden angel’s elbow (limb-joint).

4p Galactic South Pole; Purple angel’s shoulder (limb-joint).

11p Galactic Pole; Antonia’s shoulder (limb-joint).

Summer; Pink angel’s lower hand (limb-joint).

Winter; Unmarked.

The marker and the horizontal plane place summer between axes 13-14 or Leo-Cancer, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Taurus-Aries, about BC 1400. This era, between the generally alchemical and astrological time-frames, support the theme of heavenly eternity. The golden angel as type 1 Builder is in the middle top, perhaps a spring marker confirming the time-frame as the perceived alchemical or eternal past.

A general theme in the Bridal procession is type 13 Heart, of death (afterlife), eternity (heaven), or platforms (registers of clouds). All five layers of structural expression are subconscious to artists, and members of any culture.

The analysis score is 35/68 archetypal features; 18/16 axial points; 15/4 c-type sector features; 2/2 g-gate sector features; 4/5 polar markers; 0/2 planar or cardinal orientations; 1/1 correlation with the Age, or Age prior to the work; 1/2 general themes; thus 76/100, minus 5 extra characters off the axial grid; total 71%, in the top half of the sigma curve of averages.

Structuralist data confirm visual ‘grammar’

Structuralist analysis scores in the three mindprints in the central panel is 92%, 87%, 60%; in the Flight to Egypt wings 64%; in the Bridal procession 71%. Their total average is 75%, in the upper range, against currently known subconscious features in visual expression. If more universal average elements are discovered, score weighting between the layers may change. The scoring was designed to identify whether an analysis had identified the subconsciously ‘intended’ typological identifications; sequence; axial grid; polar markers; and time-frame elements. Any result above 80%, or below 40%; or consistently high or low results in artworks that could be grouped by place, time, style, or media, would indicate bias in the identified structure, or in the scoring. Given the complexity, and the consistency of about 700 test results in artworks from a wide range of cultures, styles, and eras, the method is deemed sufficient for confirming subconscious expression of archetypal structure. The unusually high score in the bottom two registers of this dense esoteric work by a team of advisors, could be ascribed to meditative integration.

Art expresses conscious and subconscious meanings

Over-conceptualisation alone (as in some paintings by Blake, and Poussin) do not achieve excessive scores, but lower some scores due to conscious interference between inspiration and design. Over-stylisation (as in many Mayan, Aztec, and some modern works) could also damage the structure of visual expression, unless it is integrated into the content and design by meditation, which in artists (as in poetry) could be defined as a process to suppress conscious involvement, and enable subconscious eye-hand-mind co-ordination. ‘Conceptual’ art typically has fewer than eleven characters, and express single types, not archetypal visual ‘grammar’. Mindprint is as innate as Zipf’s law (the frequency of words in any language follow a regular scale); or the periodic table of stable isotopes and transition elements; or the universal syntax and sub-systems in language, as Chomsky identified; or irregular cosmic geometry as Gombrich identified. Natural structure informs all of nature, including cosmology and culture. Thus most recurrent features in different works and in different media, are sustained by subconscious inspiration; while very few features are sustained by arbitrary convention (Furter 2016, in refutation of the trance convention theory). The Bad Teinach esoteric teaching board scheme contains many consciously recognisable universal features, such as planets, angels and gods, but no conscious construct or convention could explain the five layers of semi-optional features in hundreds, and probably in all artworks, built sites and other spatial media worldwide.

Double and triple grids usually interlock

Interlock between the three mindprints in the central panel, confirm each analysis, and confirms the middle register or ‘college’ mindprint twice. Interlock is never perfect, and adjacent axial grids never share any continuous axis; as if there were some lapse of orientation or time between every imprint. In complex works, the analysis scores are often lower due to lesser integration of conscious symbolism into the subconscious structure. But the Bad Teinach triptych is a masterpiece and a triumph of mediation, integration and esoteric craft.

Protestant, pagan, secular art, and rock art, has similar works, of similar subconscious complexity. No culture and no era has a monopoly on art, philosophy, alchemy, astrology, esoteric crafts, culture in general, or the expression of archetype.

Bad Teinach church exterior (after Pamela Coleman Smith).

Some Sources and References

Alchemia, 1615. Cabala as mirror of art and nature

Chomsky, N. 1986 Knowledge of Language. USA. Greenwood

Coetzee, Cyril, 2016; Princess Antonia’s Lehrtafel. Arts Society public lecture; Johannesburg

Dixon, Laurinda. 2003. Bosch. Phaidon

Endicott, K.M., & Welsch, R.L. 2005. Taking sides. Third ed., Iowa, McGraw-Hill/Dushkin

Furter, E. 2014. Mindprint, the subconscious art code. USA: Lulu.com

Furter, E. 2015a. Gobekli Tepe, between rock art and art. Expression 8. Italy: Atelier Etno

Furter, E. 2015b. Rock art expresses cultural structure. Expression 9. Italy: Atelier Etno

Furter, E. 2016. Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities. Johannesburg: Four Equators Media

Furter, E. 2017a. Recurrent characters in rock art reveal objective meaning. Expression 16, June. Italy: Atelier Etno

Furter, E. 2017b. Stoneprint tour of Paris. Stoneprint Journal 3. USA: Lulu.com

Furter, E. 2018a. ‘Babylonian Plough List decans’. http://www.stoneprintjournal.blog

Furter, E. 2018b. Stoneprint tour of London. Stoneprint Journal 4. USA: Lulu.com

Furter, E. 2018c. Culture code in seals and ring stamps. Stoneprint Journal 5. USA, Lulu.com

Furter, E. 2019a. Rennes le Chateau stoneprint tour. Stoneprint Journal 6. USA, Lulu.com

Furter, E. 2019b. Ayahuasca artists express universal structure. DMT Times /Archetypes.

Gombrich, EH. 1979. 1984 Sense of Order: A Study in the Psychology of Decorative Art. Cornell University Press

Jung, C.G. & Jaffe, A. 1965. Memories, Dreams, Reflections. New York: Random House

Jung, C.G. 1945. Philosophical tree. In Collected Works 13: Alchemical Studies

Jung, CG. 1951. Alchemical Interpretation of the Fish. Aion, CW 9, 2

Levi-Strauss, C. 1969. Raw and the cooked. Chicago. University of Chicago Press

Levi-Strauss, C. 1973. From honey to ashes. London. Jonathan Cape

Levi-Strauss. C. 1981. Naked man. New York. Harper & Row

Neugebauer, O. & Parker, R. 1969. Egyptian astronomical texts 3; Decans, planets, constellations and zodiacs. USA: Brown Univ Press

Norfleet, Phil. 2015. The altarpiece of Princess Antonia. pamela2051tripod.com

Roche, G.T. 2018. Temptation of St Anthony; on chemical mysticism. Academia.com

Rohl, D. 2007 Lords of Avaris. Century

Thompson, S. 1928, 1961. Motif index of folk literature. Ellis ref GR 67.T52. http://www.StorySearch

Uther, H.J. 2011. Types of International Folktales: A Classification and Bibliography. Helsinki: Academia Scientiarum Fennica

Zipf, G.K. 1949. Human behavior and the principle of least effort. USA: Addison-Wesley

Categories
Stoneprints in historic Western sites

The stoneprint tour of Paris

Cover and some pages from Stoneprint Journal 3: The stoneprint tour of Paris, December 2017. Four scans and several text and image extracts from this edition are posted below.
Stoneprint Journal 3, December 2017, p10.
Stoneprint Journal 3, December 2017, p11.
Stoneprint Journal 3, December 2017, p16.

Social groups always re-express a specific structure in every complex building site, including villages, temple fields, campuses and cities. Known elements of the archetypal structure of culture include some of their characteristic features; their peripheral sequence; and spacing of communal buildings as pairs of opposites, with their focal points on an axial grid with one centre point. We maintain this invisible structure even on sites built and re-built over centuries (Furter 2016). Individual artists do the same in complex artworks, subconsciously using the attributes, sequence, and spacing of the eyes of characters in their artworks (Furter 2014, and Stoneprint Journal 1 2017). Nature does the same in particles, elements, DNA, species, and in the reflexology of our irises, palms, teeth and organs (see inside).

Paris is a particularly dense example of the universal compulsive structure. The city of light re-expresses the same archetypal structure already demonstrated in fifty building sites, including Gobekli Tepe Ice Age village, Babylon, Sakkara, Giza, Kings valley, Queens valley, Meroe pyramid clusters, Nabta Playa, Jerusalem, Masada, Nemrut hill, Axum, Lalibela, Silbury area (see Stoneprint Journal 2), Magdalenburg mound, Great Zimbabwe, Sanchi, Kathmandu square, Beijing Temple of Heaven park, Horyuji, Todai, Himeji, Izapa, La Venta, Monte Alban, Coba, Uxmal, Chichen Itza, Teotihuacan, El Tajin, Palenque,  Machu Picchu, Tiahuanaco, Nazca geoglyphs, Crow Canyon kiva village, Rome, the Forums, Ephesus, Brescia, Piacenza (see below), Santiago de Compostella, Cape Town and Quebec.

  • Furter, ED. 2017. Stoneprint Journal 3. December. Four Equators Media, Johannesburg. Sixteen pages A4, four in colour. $6 plus postage. Order from Edmondfurter at gmail dot com, or via the Comment function on this blog. An extract will be added to the second edition of Stoneprint.

Buildings are durable copies of eternity

Buildings are apparently the most concrete, yet spatially the most abstract of physical media. They divide contesting voids, requiring our minds to hold functional maps. Even in plan view, their spatial structure is more difficult to visualise than a complex artwork. Buildings, camps and cities serve many functions, including protection, exploitation, and as canvases for ritual and abstract protection. Thus buildings are also talismans to influence intangible forces. Imprints of social functions are also divining boards with moving characters and a limited set of optional events. Insurance companies understand events well enough to predict average numbers of events. Divination attempts to discover overdue influences.

As there is no perfect or complete magic ritual, so there is no perfect or complete building, artwork, myth, pantheon or culture. Cities involve several media (see Babylonian temple building materials, trade, rituals, religious, state and economic functions in Stoneprint Early Civilisations chapter). The Bible also notes a list of different crafts required for the temple, with tutelary angels who inspire the relevant skills: “Bezaleel was appointed to make artefacts for the tabernacle. God had filled him with all manner of workmanship.” (Exodus 31:2). Building specialisation, as in the Lanjia Saora tribe in rural India (Dash 2016), requires social structure and a calendar, a social clockwork that synchronises more than work shifts. The USA constitution requires social institutions to enable “the pursuit of happiness”. King Ur Nanshe, King Gudea and their people found the same rewards in their strenuous and expensive building projects, including “separating heaven and earth”, or resolving concepts.

The difference between characters on a rock face, pavement, engraving, paper or canvas; and building members on a site or landscape, is primarily a difference in scale. Art is individual work, and building is social work. Both are enabled by abstract shapes (Dieter 2016) and recognition of analogy. Cities express cultural structure by our collective eye-hand-mind co-ordination. Hints of our ability to subconsciously “act as one” (as King Gudea’s people did on his building site), are also visible in collaborative or cumulative artworks. Like ants, we are capable of instinctive collaboration, but unaware of most of the design parameters of collaboration.

All cities re-express the eternal building code

Our huts, houses, kivas, circles, pillars, fortune bowls, art, game boards, temples, pyramids, cities, constellations, geoglyphs and graves, say much more about us that we ever knew. Structuralist analysis reveals universal repertoire in our subconscious behaviour. The structure also says more about culture and nature than we ever knew, but had glimpsed in nature.

We imprint a natural, abstract structure of five layers, including sixteen characters in sequence, on an axial grid, in all our complex artefacts. The same structure appears in the periodic table, and in reflexology points in our hands, eyes, teeth and ears. A similar structure informs bio-chemistry and DNA. The archetypal expression in our works, or the cultural record, is now readable. Its subconscious elements carry significant implications for the human sciences of art history, archaeology, anthropology, philosophy, psychology, sociology and communication science. The formerly ‘invisible’ layers of our perception and expression, or natural code, now offer the opportunity to integrate the conscious and subconscious halves of crafts, sciences, and culture.

Our works re-express nature, and our place in it. The core content of any old or new culture is now revealed to be as predictable as chemistry, as readable as the periodic table, as translatable as language, as visible as art, as varied as mythology, and as recyclable as building material.

Architects, engineers and builders are not aware of the visual grammar that they could not see, but could never contradict. Archetypal structure and culture existed before we did, and before the universe, and will outlive the cycles of its expression in art and cities intact.

Whether we are few, as when we built the houses illustrated in the Ice Age chapter; or many, as when we built the pyramid fields and cities illustrated in the historic chapters; we express the core content of culture in all our media, with as much apparent variety as possible. But stylistic differences fade when the core content of culture is revealed. We all build, draw, talk, trade, count, strategise, pray and fight the same. Stoneprint lifts the ‘beam’ of self-deception from our cities, and from our supposedly scientific eyes. We will continue designing art and buildings by intuition, but we could never see or study our works with half our brains again.

Northern hemisphere and adjacent stars, projected around the ecliptic north pole (after Skychart, with celestial poles precessed to 2016. Constellations lines, stoneprint labels and division grid by ED Furter).

Cosmology is a canvas of natural and cultural structure

Cosmology inevitably combines properties of nature, of innate perception (which is also a reflection of nature), and experience (within natural and cultural contexts). The best canvas for cosmology is a sphere, such as the sky, containing three equators and three sets of polar axles (thus six polar points); and random dots to mark space; and moving luminaries to calibrate time. Our inherent compulsion for seeing wholes among potential parts, or gestalt, invite us to imprint species, functions, myths, rituals and conceptual correspondences on the sky, as it does in art, myth, ritual, and buildings.

Most of the 28-odd near-ecliptic constellations (in and next to the zodiac), do not have their eyes on a grid of opposites centred at any pole, as they do in art and architecture. The sky is therefore not a stoneprint, but a good canvas for natural and cultural categories, such as species, characters and concepts. Constellation figures are strong in typology and in sequence, due to their mythic labels. Their outlines are abstract and highly optional, as archetypes are. Constellations are also strong on cosmology, thanks to the three equators and sets of poles. Instead of an axial grid between characters, cosmology has a strong grid of division lines between characters. Every section is a homogenous field or ‘sign’, enabling movement with precession of the celestial poles, as a kind of moving clock face (as used in astrology). However nature, artworks and buildings remain fixed on the ecliptic grid, while allowing only two limb joints or junctures near the centre to express the approximate precessional Age (usually the Age preceding the work).

The sequence of archetypal concepts in Western constellations is (noting known archetypal attributes in brackets):

1 Builder/Sacker; Taurus horns (bovid); Auriga; Orion (twisting)

2 Builder; Taurus Hyades skull (bovid); Perseus (twisting); Pleiades (cluster)

2c Basket; Star Algol (Medusa head)

3 Queen; Aries; Triangulum (knife), star Hamal, neck (long or bent neck); Cetus Tail as its body (dragon)

4 King; Pisces, fishes tied; Pegasus square (rectangular)

4p Galactic South Pole; Cetus (Whale) spout (limb joint)

5a Priest; Aquarius, zebra (varicoloured), or praying mantis (hyperactive), or priest; Pegasus legs (horizontal)

5b Priest; Aquarius, half of the above (large. Sometimes a tailcoat head)

5c BasketTail; Capricornus tail knot, in Aquarius (sometimes double-headed)

6 Exile; Capricornus (caprine); Austrinus (ingress /egress)

7 Child; Sagittarius; Cygnus, Swan, (bag? rope? chariot?)

7g Galactic Centre; River (water) 8 as Scorpius tail (long tail); Ophiuchus giant (large, strength feat)

9 Healer; Scorpius head with claws (strength feat); Hercules who briefly carried earth (bent forward, pillar)

9c BasketLid; Lupus, Wolf (canid) or Centaurus legs; Serpens

10 Teacher; Libra, figured by Bootes over Virgo; Corona arm (arms in V/W posture, or wheel); Serpens Caput (Head) or snake on staff (staff)

11 Womb; Virgo; star Spica (Wheat) as her womb (womb); under Bootes

11p Galactic Pole; Coma (Hair), L-shaped (limb joint)

12 Heart; Leo retro (feline, inversion); Crater (Grail); Hydra (waterwork)

13 Heart; Leo (feline); star Regulus on his heart (heart); Ursa (Bear) as sword or scythe (weapon)

13c BasketHead; Leo Minor, or Leo forepaws? (attributes not yet isolated)

14 Mixer; Cancer, Y-shaped (sometimes a tree); Ursa Minor between two poles (ingress /egress); Lynx (sometimes a small canine or feline); Hydra head

15 Maker; Gemini (doubled), standing on the galactic gate (churn), holding Ursa’s head (rope); Canis; Canis Minor (canid), mace shape (smiting, sceptre); Lynx and Ursa Minor shared with 14 (bag)

15g Galactic Gate; Gemini foot (path), star Tejat; at Orion’s rear hand or club; at Auriga’s rear foot (path).

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is unmarked as usual in all media. The celestial poles slowly move. The northern celestial pole is currently at Ursa Minor’s hoof (limb joint). The southern celestial south pole is currently on a Dorado (Goldfish) fin (limb joint). Celestial poles cause summer and winter, always 90 degrees ahead of spring and autumn, as they move in tandem.

No culture ever consciously knew the extent of the archetypal structure that enables and sustains cultural expression in all their media, from myth to buildings and constellations. These sets do not arise from one another. They sometimes swop out some features, sustaining the common view that myth illustrates ‘the sky’. Stoneprint demonstrates that there is an invisible common cause to all media.

The mindprint model of archetypal characters as social functions, with their sequential, spatial and polar relationships (after Furter 2014, 2019).

The abstract chart of archetypes

Natural manifestation seems to start in galactic planes, as it does in the universe. Either table, or both, could manifest in left- or right-handed versions. Space-time and energy-matter are also ‘emergent’. Culture is equally ‘emergent’, since every expression is original, despite its apparently ‘cumulative and developmental’ stylistic context. When crossing the gaps between stable isotopes of matter, particles shed or absorb light of predictable wavelengths. Likewise, visual archetypes transform by shedding and adopting traits, such as postures, functions, tools, or species; predicted by the stoneprint list, its sequence, its frequencies of probability, its spacing as pairs of opposites, and its tri-polar features. Our conscious minds rebel against the implications of quanta, and the thought that constants have internal structure (Connell 2017). Likewise there is no apparent cause for the pervasive structure in cultural media; or for close structural correspondences between media; or for cultural modelling on invisible natural structure. Our conscious mind rebels against its exclusion from what now emerges as a wide range of subconscious behaviour.

Five layers of cultural structure

Every complex artwork, artefact, building site, geoglyph, pyramid field, or city, expresses five inter-related levels of subconscious structure (A to E):

(A) Types. Characters, rooms or buildings, express sixteen types, each with a small set of specific optional attributes. Some works combine eight of the types into four, thus express only twelve. Most characters express only one of their typological attributes in a work. Some attributes appear at known average frequencies. More attributes of each type may be discovered.

(B) Sequence. The types are near the edge of the work, intervened by four borderline types (c), and two polar points (p), and two galactic points (g):

1 2 2c 3 4 4p 5a 5b 5c 6 7 7g 8 9 9c 10 11 11p 12 13 13c 14 15 15g.

Types 1 /2 and 8/9, or 5a/5b and 12/13 may each be single or double.

The two galactic poles, 4p and 11p (or pG and pGs), are usually on limb joints or junctures.

(C) Axial grid of eyes or focal points, are formed by pairs of opposites (v):

1v8 2v9 3v10 4v11 4p,v11p, 5a,v12 5b,v13 6v14 7v15  (v for versus).

Type 11 has her womb on the grid. Type 12/13 has his heart on the grid.

The four cista (c) borderline types often lack axial opposites. The grid resembles the mill, or ‘many-coloured cover’ of Icelandic myth.

(D) Six polar points are often on limb joints, each at fixed frequencies.

The two galactic poles, 4p and 11p, are near the ‘equator’ of types.

The two ecliptic poles are on the axial centre, appearing as one point, pE.

The two celestial poles, pC and pCs, are near the centre, often on limb joints.

(E) Horizontal or vertical orientation of the work (east or north in buildings), is often parallel to either the celestial or galactic polar axle.

The celestial polar axle indicates the solstice positions of the Age of the culture or the inspiration, usually the Age prior to the work. Ages are named after the spring equinox position (90 degrees before the solstice). Artefacts express either Age Gemini, Taurus1, Taurus2, Aries, Pisces, or a transition between two of these.

Each of the five layers adds meaning, and removes ambiguity; like diction, syntax, tenses, genders and context add meaning in language.

Sixteen archetypes, in sequence

Characters or focal points in every complex artwork, building site or city, containing more than eleven figures, express a minimum of twelve, usually sixteen, sometimes up to 22 archetypes, in the standard sequence. Types are expressed by public features with a mixture of functional, symbolic and historic meanings, notably religious, monumental, commemorative and iconographic features. Railway stations do not seem to form part of the structure. The known optional features of the types, some with known average frequencies, include the four borderline types (c), and the two galactic polar points (p), and the two galactic gates (g).

Type label; features with average frequencies (used in early analyses; to be updated by 2019 data):

1 and/or 2 Builder; twisted 48%, tower 22%, bovid 19%, cluster 14%, build 12%, sack 10%, pit 13%, bird 10%, book 6%,

2c Basket; secret 17%, container 13%, woven texture 13%,

3 Queen; long or bent neck 37%, dragon 14%, sacrifice 13%, school 11%, queen 9%, pool 9%, spring 6%, equid,

4 King; squatting 25%, rectangular 20%, twins 11%, king 9%, bird 6%, field 6%, furnace,

4p Galactic South Pole; marked 65%, limb-joint 50%, juncture, spout 13%, cardinal alignment.

5a and/or 5b Priest; assembly 30%, varicoloured 30%, hyperactive 30%, horizontal 30%, priest 15%, water 15%, %, tailcoat head, heart of 12/13, inverted of 12/13,

5c BasketTail; (see later posts)

6 Exile; egress /ingress 48%, sacrifice 13%, small 13%, U-shaped 11%, tree, volute, reptile, amphibian, horned, double-headed,

7 Child; unfolding 17%, bag 13%, rope 12%, juvenile 10%, chariot 8%,

7g Galactic Centre; (gate, water 15%. see later data).

8 and/or 9 Healer; pillar 50%, bent forward 30%, healer 11%, strength 9%, ritual,

9c Basket Lid; revelation 15%, law enforcement 9%, ,,,,

10 Teacher; arms V/W-posture 50%, staff 17%, council 17%, guard 15%, market 8%, metallurgy 8%, crown /disc /wheel 10%, school 8%, canid,

11 Womb; womb /interior 87%, mother 60%, tomb 13%, water 11%, library 11%, wheat 6%, law 6%,

11p Galactic Pole; marked 81%, limb joint 68%, juncture, cardinal alignment,

12 and/or 13 Heart; heart /chest /interior 85%, feline 20%, death 33%, waterwork 30%, rounded 26%, bastion 22%, war 17%, weapon 13%, palace 11%, inverted,

13c BasketHead; prediction 11%, texture 6%,,,,

14 Mixer; ingress /egress 50%, bird 10%, tree 6%, canine, transform,

15 Maker; rope 30%, order 25%, bag 10%, face 10%, doubled 10%, pool 8%, canine 8%, create, churn, sceptre, mace, rampant,

15g Galactic Gate; gate 20%, river 6%,,,

The axial grid of opposite pairs

There is only one possible way to connect the maximum number of eyes of characters, on an artwork or map, by an axial grid (or two adjacent grids where there are more than about 25 characters, as on several Mexican building sites).

Placing sixteen eyes, doors, spires, statues or tombs on an axial grid, as pairs of opposites, is less difficult than it may seem at first. The artist or architect could place the first four eyes or buildings according to practical considerations of the canvas, or site, ideally in a more or less X shape. The two invisible axes between them may cross anywhere, ideally near the middle of the canvas or site. The fifth character or building could also be almost anywhere, thus –X shaped. Only from the sixth character or building onward, thus –X– shaped, every eye or defining feature has to find an opposite, with the axis between them crossing over the point established by the first two axes. Some works may start with up to eight characters, without any axial opposites; and find their opposites from the ninth character onward.

Sixteen axial points, on eight axes, require precise eye-hand-mind co-ordination, or surveyor-architect co-ordination, in placing characters sixth to sixteenth; a total of eleven feats (or more on complex sites such as Paris). The axial grid also confirms the peripheral sequence. Builders could place a type 1 /2 opposite any type other than 8/9 (twelve possible contradictions), or a type 3 opposite any type other than 10 (fourteen possible contradictions), and so on with types 4-11, 5a-12, 5b-13, 6-14 and 7-15 (another 52 possible contradictions). There are 78 chances for contradiction, against only eight chances to express the standard set of sequential opposites on an axial grid. A shift in the position of two or three eyes, could erase the sequence and the structure, but almost never does so.

A testable definition of stoneprint

The definition of stoneprint is a testable series of conditional or inter-dependent claims about cultural artefacts, offering an over-determined result:

“In any artwork or building site, containing eleven or more characters or focal features in relative proximity;

AT LEAST twelve eyes or focal points are on an axial grid with one focal point;

AND about 60% of the characters express one or more of their known optional typological attributes;

AND some attributes have fixed frequencies in random samples above 100;

AND the characters are in the standard peripheral sequence;

AND axially opposite their usual counterparts;

AND some limb joints or corners (not eyes or foci) are on one of the two implied galactic poles, or on one of the two implied celestial poles;

AND the celestial axle is on the implied solstice axis of the precessional Age or Age transition, of the relevant culture, usually prior to the work.

One of the polar axles may be parallel to the ground-line or vertical of the artwork, or cardinal direction of the site.

The implied spring point, a quarter of the cycle before the relative summer solstice, may be marked by a feature linked to sacrifice or rejuvenation.

The conscious theme of the work may amplify one of the character types.”

The analysis test formula of ,,,,,[see later posts],,,, results in an average of 60%, with a sigma curve of 30%; the lower average at 50%; the higher average at 80%. Any score below 40% indicates analysis failure. Structuralist failure is less than 1% on average. Any score over 80% indicates cultural or conceptual bias to recognise attributes and themes that are not categorically visible, or repeated revisions of artefacts, such as cities.

The cumulative definition of stoneprint is statistically impossible to attribute to learning or conscious design. Our subconscious eye-hand-mind co-ordination is therefore structured, compulsive, but subconscious. Individual and social behaviour is more inspired, detailed, and abstract, than any craft or science had described.

Axial grids are not Morley’s or Napoleon’s angles

Axial grids are not inherent in any collection of about twelve to twenty items. Morley’s miracle (1899) applies only to the equilateral shape of an inner triangle, formed by the intersections of lines that trisect the corners of any irregular triangle into three equal parts. In axial grids, all adjacent angles are unequal.

Napoleon’s theorem applies only to some predictable properties of equilateral triangles, based on the edges of a triangle. Axial grids are not based on lines of equal length.

No property of axes, or eyes, or building focal points, requires pairs of eyes to be on any kind of grid.

Average leeway for each character reduces by half with every pair added (from about 180 degrees, down to about 22 degrees). Yet even at the least leeway, a change as small as one degree in the angular position of a focal point in a city, could leave two characters unaccounted for. The average chance for non-alignment is about 20:1.

Two galactic points, and six polar points

The two implied galactic gates, or cross-points of the galactic equator over the ecliptic, are listed among the types, since they are the primary ‘border’ points. They are listed in italic letters, to distinguish them from the types:

7g Galactic Centre; Vortex, or water

15g Gate; Path, or net, or grid, or churn group.

The two implied galactic poles are also listed among the types, since they are near the equator of types, and also act as border points. They are also listed in italic letters, to distinguish them from the types:

11p Galactic Pole; 81% marked, 68% limb-joint, 

4p Galactic S.Pole; 65% marked, 50% limb-joint, [see later data]

The galactic south pole, when expressed, usually appears inside the ‘equator’ of types, indicating that our subconscious cosmology is like a transparent sphere, or ‘beach ball’, with the lower hemisphere under the top half (see images in the Astronomical section).

Celestial polar markers are near the ecliptic pole (axial centre), also both inside the structure, confirmed by frequencies of limb joints here. In analysis texts, the two celestial poles are listed last:

pC Celestial Pole, on the ‘summer’ axis; 60% marked, 50% limb-joint, 

pCs Celestial South Pole, on the ‘winter’ axis; 55% marked, 37% limb-joint, 

Studies of the visual effect named Subjective Visual Vertical, found that orientation of the head relative to gravity is constantly signalled from the otolith organs, above all by the utricles, to the central nervous system. Any linear acceleration displaces the otoconial mass, and thus shears the embedded sensory hair bundles against the otolith maculae. This results in a potential change in the sensory cell and in the afferent discharge rate of the cell. Thus a viewer could accurately estimate the Subjective Visual Vertical, unless if suffering from utricle dysfunction.

The polar time-frame

The position of the two celestial poles move with precession, and so do their markers in art and architecture (and probably in myth and ritual, however a categorical test of subconscious structure in texts has yet to be found).

For example, a few recent artworks and building sites have polar markers near the Taurus-Scorpius axis, thus summer; implying spring and the time-frame as Age Pisces-Aquarius, usually confirmed by a spring marker between Pisces and Aquarius (see Pablo Amaringo’s art in Mindprint).

In Age Pisces artworks or buildings, from about BC 80 to AD 2016, astronomical celestial polar markers were on or near the Gemini-Sagittarius solstice axis. However most works made in Age Pisces, express the configuration of the prior Age Pisces-Aries, or of Age Aries, with celestial poles on or near the Cancer-Capricornus solstice axis.  Likewise, most works made in Age Aries, express the prior Age Taurus, with their celestial polar markers on the Leo-Aquarius solstice axis.

Most works made in Age Taurus, (which are rare due to decay and renovation), express the prior Age Gemini-Taurus, with their celestial polar markers on or near the Virgo-Pisces solstice axis.

Some Ice Age cave art, and some Gobekli Tepe kiva-type pillared houses, express an Age Gemini polar configuration (see the Ice Age chapter. See a discussion of precession and astronomical Ages, in the Astrology section below).

Poles and limb joints are angles

In art, some of the five polar points are on limb joints, such as a hip (or rump in animals), shoulder, knee, elbow, hand, foot, or jaw. Characters and postures essentially consist of limb joints, thus of angles. Artists habitually use limb joint angles to redirect the wandering eyes of viewers back to the conscious focal points of a design, but are not aware of the subconscious structural roles of some specific joints. The ‘galactic‘ equators in art and buildings lie along two interlinked ovals, sometimes partly along a row of joints, plants, ropes or paths. Some illustrations in this book mark these ovals by large curves, with the northern and southern halves both extended into two wholes. Their intersection appears to form a vesica piscis, or ‘fish’ section. Inspiration may arise from or via type 7g Galactic Centre.

In buildings, the polar points are on corners, T-junctions, or posts. This variation makes the polar points in architecture more uncertain than in art. ‘Joints’ abound in the built environment, as they do in art (thirteen limb joints per person or animal), yet there is often something notable about the ‘polar joints’ in art and in building sites or cities.

Palm reflexology chart (after Accuview, with typological labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Natural maps in our limbs and works

Many versions of structural expression in nature and culture are in front of our eyes. Some natural and cultural types are synonymous, such as a heart and womb being directly pictured in art as a prominent chest and a womb. We build many of the elements of archetypal structure into architecture, in more or less abstract form in myth and ritual.

The sequence of archetypes in our left palm is (noting archetypal features in brackets):

1 Builder; Senses

2 Builder; Throat

2c Basket; Hands and forearms

3 Queen; Left brain arteries

4 King; Left eye

4p Galactic South Pole; Jaw (limb joint)

5a Priest; Right eye (varicoloured, hyperactive)

5b Priest; Left leg (large)

5c BasketTail; Feet

6 Exile; Right leg

7 Child; Skin (bag); and liver (bag)

7g Galactic Centre; Windpipe (bag); and on the ‘horizontal’ plane (juncture)

8 Healer; Kidney

9 Healer; Gall

9c BasketLid; Pancreas

10 Teacher; Appendix

11 Womb; Womb (womb)

11p Galactic Pole; Kidney

12 Heart; Bladder (water-work)

13 Heart; Heart (heart)

13c BasketHead; Chest?

14 Mixer; Left lung, near the centre (ingress)

15 Maker; Liver; and Lymph (rope?)

15g Gate; Left shoulder (limb-joint).

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is on the solar plexus (juncture). The celestial pole is on a heart muscle. The celestial south pole is on the throat. The horizontal plane places midsummer in Gemini-Taurus, thus spring and the time-frame in Age Pisces-Aquarius, our current Age. However time-frames may apply only to cultural expressions, and not to natural works. Priest (Aquarian) types on two of the fingers, seem to confirm the orientation of the stoneprint in our iris (below), where the Priest types are nearest one another, flanking the nose. This orientation is also confirmed by the stoneprint (or rather boneprint) in our mouths (see below).

Human iris reflexology chart (after Bernhard Jensen, with typological labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Eyes are windows to organs and structure

The sequence and relative spacing of iris connections to other body organs offer a physical map to the looped arrangement of our vital organs and functions. The natural typology in our left iris is (noting archetypal attributes):

1 Builder; Inherent mind, connected crosswise left-right (twisting)

2 Builder; Senses, connected crosswise left-right (twist); movement

2c Basket; Pituitary gland

3 Queen; Acquired mind

4 King; Nose

4p Galactic South Pole; Bronchus; intestines; tonsils (limb joint)

5a Priest; Vocal chords; and trachea

5b Priest; Scapula; and spine top

5c BasketTail; back

6 Exile; upper spine (tree), near the centre (ingress)

7 Child; Bladder (bag); and Tract

7g Galactic Centre; Genitals (limb-joint)

8 Healer; Anus; and Scrotum

9 Healer; Kidney; and Adrenals

9c BasketLid; Legs

10 Teacher; Groin

11 Womb; Testes or ovaries (womb)

11p Galactic Pole; Spleen or Diaphragm

12 Heart; Solar plexus

13 Heart; Heart (heart)

13c BasketHead; Bronchus

14 Mixer; Lungs

15 Maker; Skull; mastoid skull edge points, connected to neck muscles (rope)

15g Gate; Equilibrium centre (juncture) or medulla.

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is in the pupil, but offset to the lower inner side, towards the body centre. The celestial poles may be on the horizontal plane, on the heart-throat axis, placing midsummer in Leo, thus spring and the archetypal human time-frame in Age Taurus, confirmed by the top central position of Taurus. However time-frames may apply only to cultural artefacts, not to natural expressions, where slow mutations may be inherent and thus timeless.

Our ‘boneprint’ in dental reflexology

Teeth, the only semi-exposed bone, are our most instinctive analogy for stone pillars or walls in a cave, hut, broch, kiva or village. A set of teeth is symmetrical on two planes, thus split into mirrored quarters, and used as two hemispheres.

Teeth are linked in myth to the calendar, and to monsters, like the dragon teeth that Cadmus sowed to sprout soldiers. The calendric analogy is to the growing moon, and to changes in the number of our teeth from temporary juvenile 10+10 =20 (as in the unbroken 20-day ‘month’ cycle in the Mayan calendar), to the adult 16+16 =32 (decanal hours, and approximate days in a solar month). The average age when our teeth erupt follow a ragged, bottom-top (B/T) sequence, with some skips or jumps, in these months; 8B, 9T, 11T, 13B, 16B, 16T, 19T, 20B, 27T, 29B. The average age when teeth shed and replace, also follows an interrupted sequence, in years 6.5, 7.5; 10, 10.5, 11. Eruption and replacement make a total of fifteen events, resulting in 16 teeth on each jaw. Our teeth also chart our organs, but in a more compact, replicated, and redundant form. Teeth are also parts of a limb joint, and mimic oblique equators.

Cities resemble teeth

Most buildings, towns and cities are divided into quarters, like teeth are. Each quarter is usually a functional unit. Our buildings and cities are clusters of mostly cuboid materials in interlocking planes, with their third dimension in the spacing between flat planes, allowing rooms, doors, streets, squares, and thus functionality. Likewise, molecules could be modelled as clusters, or a collection of energy tracks, where space is as functional as material. Electron ‘traffic’ in the outer orbital determines chemical reactivity, thus expressing their characters and enabling their compounds. Cells are usually modelled as spheres, but actually resemble hexagonal discs, as in mud, DNA bases, and collagen (Robert Temple 2003). Analogies, or inter-media translations, reveal some aspects of invisible potentiality, or structure itself. We have traced and used that structure in nature, using physics (expressed in quanta and laws), chemistry and biology. But we have been slow to codify the structure of culture, despite the efforts of structuralists such as Plato in logic, JG Frazer in myth, Jacobsen and Chomsky in language, Levi-Strauss in social behaviour, Freud and Jung in motivations, and Gombrich in art analysis. Stoneprint extends the periodic table of culture from art, to buildings and nature. It allows the study of structure itself, thus of archetype, which enables elements to manifest and co-exist in the range of natural expressions that we are intimate parts of, and wherein we express some minor wonders of the world, including wondrous buildings and cities.

Our buildings, temple complexes and cities could be read as ‘abstract’ two-dimensional maps of archetype, thus more simplistic than our intricate three-dimensional bodies. But maps are deceptively simple. Building sites express an interrupted symmetry that could be charted by a T-shape in a circle, like the ancient T-O or ((+)) world map convention. Our teeth form such a map. Jaws express cosmology in terms of space, and in practical functions of digestion they perform. Two half-equators of teeth form digitally calibrated ecliptic and celestial arcs, of variable obliquity to one another, much like the celestial rotation of about 23.4 degrees (formerly larger). Opened wider, our dental plates resemble the galactic obliquity of about 61 degrees.

The most direct bridge for reconciling or ‘tacking’ our teethprint with our eyeprint, handprint, earprint, mindprint and stoneprint, is our body map. There is some variation in reflexology allocations of body parts to teeth, due to near complete replication in every quarter. Yet some differences between the four quarters of our teeth, reveal the sequence of dominant reflexology points. The same applies to buildings and cities. Every quarter, or at least two halves, each have a gate, temple, well, and the rest of the usual features; yet there are clues to which teeth most directly link to the organs ascribed to them.

We should first attempt to find consensus between rival teeth reflexology charts; then between eye, hand, ear, and teeth reflexology.

Dental reflexology chart (after Naturalmatters. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Potential consensus between the adult dental reflexology charts of Kliegels, Pugh, Natural Matters, and Furian, invites allocation of stoneprint types, here clockwise to the observer, starting from the bottom incisors:

1 RT07 Incisor2+1; Kidney, Genitals; Mouth, Ears

2 LT09 Incisor1+2; Kidney; Genitals; Mouth, Ears

2c LT11 Canine; Liver; Eyes; Hips, Knees

3 LT12 +13 Premolar1+2; Intestine +Colon

4 LT14 Molar1; Spleen, Thyroid; Feet

4p LT15 Molar1; Stomach, Spleen

5a LT16 Molar3; Small Intestint, Nerves Central, Brain, Heart; Knee

5b LB17 Molar3; Small Intestine; Nerves Peripheral, Brain, Heart

5c LB18+19 Molar2+1; ?

6 LB20+21 Premolar2+1; Spleen, Stomach; Mouth

7 LB22 Canine; Liver

7g LB23 Incisor2; Bladder?

8 LB23 Incisor2+1; Bladder, Genitals

9 LB24 Incisor1+2; Bladder, Genitals

9c RB27 Canine; Liver, Genitals?, Gall

10 RB28+29 Premolar1+2; Pancreas, Liver, Stomach

11 RB30 Molar1; Valve? Veins?

11p Galactic Pole; RB31 Molar2; ?

12 RB32 Molar3; Heart, Small Intestine, Nerves Peripheral; Shoulder

13 RT01 Molar3; Heart, Small Intestine; Shoulder

13c RT02+03 Molar2+1; Pancreas, Stomach, Thyroid

14 RT04 Pemolar2+1; Lung, Intestine

15 RT06 Canine; Liver, Gall; Eyes.

Our last three teeth eruptions indicate part of a natural maturity cycle:

Type 7 Child and its opposite 15 Maker, erupt late, both doubled

Type 3 Queen and its opposite 10 Teacher erupt later, both doubled

Types 5a and 5b Priest, and their opposites 12 and 13 Heart, erupt last. The ‘wisdom’ teeth are analogous to the heart.

Juvenile teeth compared to adult teeth radially (after Furian. Concentric format, stoneprint labels, and axial grid by ED Furter).

Cities express more half-types

Hard media, such as stone, wood and mortar, more often express the four Cista (Basket) borderline types, than soft media such as art, myth and ritual do. Some decanal figures in Egyptian calendric art also include borderline types.

Characters are patient

The regular sixteen character types are harder to spot on plans and maps than in art, where living creatures parade with identifiable names, postures, items, and functions. Types in buildings manifest more slowly than in art, usually from collaboration, and from compromises between functions, design, engineering, budget and other ‘teething’ problems. Some attributes could take many years to manifest, like cathedrals. Several layers of remodelling may obscure one another. Yet the result is always predictably structured.

An inner ear reflex map (after Heal Yourself /AU. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Two body maps in our ears

Inner ear lobe reflexes offer yet another body and cosmology model for mapping attributes in peripheral sequence:

1 eye

2 eye

2c endocrine gland

3 adrenal gland

4 nose

4p Galactic South Pole on lower jaw (limb joint)

5 mouth (hyperactive)

6 ?

7 uthera?

8 large intestine

9 kidneys

9c pancreas

10 gall

11 liver?

13 heart (heart)

14 lung?; near the centre (ingress /egress)

15 brain stem (with a rope)

15g Gate at upper jaw.

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is at the esophagus (windpipe). If the celestial poles were on the horizontal plane, as in cultural media, they place our inner ear lobe’s summer in Leo, thus its spring and temporal framework in Age Taurus. However time-frames probably do not apply to organisms.

The outer ear lobe reflexology chart has yet another reflexology map of our internal organs (Cocoandcowe). The outer ear lobe reflexes also offer astoneprint model of limbs, instead of organs (in peripheral sequence):

1 lower jaw

2 left eye

2c forehead or inner ‘eye’

3 right eye

4 inner ears and nose

4p Galactic South Pole on lumbar or sacral spine

5a heel

5b ankle and knee

5c foot

6 toes, far from the centre (ingress /egress)

7 ankle

8 toes

9 little finger

9c fingers

10 hand (staff)

11 abdomen (womb)

11p Galactic Pole on elbow (limb joint)

12 chest (heart)

13 arm

14 shoulder

15 shoulder (smiting)

15g Gate; Neck.

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is on the thoracic spine. The celestial pole is on the occiput. The celestial south pole is on the solar plexus, or nerves joint (limb joint). The horizontal plane confirms our ear lobe summer in Virgo-Leo, thus spring and the temporal framework in Age Gemini-Taurus, at the Gate. Time-frames probably apply only to cultural expressions, not to nature.

Reflexes include our body organs sequence

Organ reflex sequences in our palms, eyes, teeth and ears, reveal a doubled typology sequence in our bodies, as infinity curves or Moebus rings. DNA studies indicate that our bodies were formed by a combination of four primitive worms.

Peg-board from Karazhalia village in Bulgaria, named Karanovo tablet (after Mathilda’s Anthropology Blog. Stoneprint labels and axes by ED Furter).

A ‘reality’ game on a Bulgarian liver pegboard

Divination tablets and game boards trade in stock questions and answers, for stock situations. A peg-board from Karazhalia village in Bulgaria, named Karanovo tablet, probably used markers for divination or ‘reality’ games. Tracing out the invisible axial grid reveals that one hole is misplaced. Typological identification reveals the reason: the hole expresses the eye of type 11 Womb, but the grid line is on her ‘womb’ as usual. The format resembles clay liver map tablets used in oracle systems since Sumerian times, up to the Roman era. Divination bridges the apparent contradictions between universal and local, general and specific, simple and complex, natural and cultural. The physical functions of culture include legitimising exploitation. The abstract functions include expressing and attempting to resolve apparent contradictions between our conscious and subconscious minds (Leach 1970, citing Levi-Strauss 1981).

Piacenza bronze liver OUTER edge gods (names after Morandi. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Piacenza bronze liver INNER fields gods (names after Morandi. Stoneprint labels and axial grids by ED Furter).

Two circles of gods on a liver model

Sixteen sections divide the outer rim of the Etruscan Piacenza bronze liver divination chart, and 22 fields divide the interior, which includes some polar features. These two axial grids are secure, but the identities remain uncertain, probably scrambled by political customisation. However the sets of attributes, and thus divination outcomes, were probably less affected. Pliny and Cicero understood both sets as ‘astrological houses of gods’, thus a cosmology, but not necessarily of constellations. Several planets are named, thus there are as many ‘hands as ‘hours’. God names on the Piacenza liver were adopted from three cultures, revealing how Etruscan diviners subconsciously maintained universal structure by selective mixing and matching. The Etruscan League in its collective subconscious carved out a stylistic multi-cultural identity, as a trade mediator. The two cycles of gods here (as in Etruscan art), are from three different sets of gods. Ironically, the subconscious sequence of characters in Piacenza city, mostly of saints; and among its gates, mostly of family names, are much more distinctive than the sequence of consciously re-worked and rationalised planetary entities on the liver model, which include door or gate gods. Conscious interference does not scramble conscious artworks or building sites, but it could scramble a palm-sized divination device and a religious training school subject to political uses.

Piacenza city map (after Baedeker. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by ED Furter). Different maps may exclude some features, thus analysts should use several maps.

Piacenza city, a stoneprint of saints and bastions

Piacenza lies just south of the Po River. A bronze liver divination model was found about 15 miles from the city. The sequence of archetypes in the city is:

1 St Vincenzo. OFF THE GRID, without an apparent opposite at 8

2 St Antonio

2c St Arostino?; Municipal Theatre (off the grid, as usual)

3 Filodrome Theatre annex (long or bent neck)

4 ? near the theatre

5a St Carmel

5b St John (camel-skin with tailcoat head); and Castle (large)

6 St Sepoler Hospital, far out (ingress /egress); and St?; and St? (double-headed), near the centre (ingress /egress)

7 St Sepoler; and St Mad di Campagna

9 St ?

9c Civic Museum (often off the grid)

10 St Bufenia

11 St Sisto

12 ?

13 Palace Farnese (sometimes royal)

14 St Savino, far out; and St Francis, nearby (both ingress /egress)

15 St ? dome.

The celestial pole is near Palace Gotico Elonisi, east from the axial centre, placing midsummer in Leo-Cancer, thus spring and the inspiration in Age Taurus-Aries, about BC 1500, at the perceived formation of Etruscan culture.

Piacenza city stoneprint (left of centre), and defensive wall stoneprint (right of centre), by ED Furter.

The sequence of archetypes among Piacenza city gates is:

2 south-east bastion

2c half-bastion on the Vauxhall wall

3 south bastion

4 military hospital outside the wall, rectangular

5b castle south bastion (large)

5c castle’s north-west bastion

6 gate Antonia, far out (ingress /egress)

7 west-north-west bastion

7g Galactic Centre; Outer bastion NW, on the river (water)

9 bastion Borghetto, with a large belvedere (bent)

9c Gate St Sisto

10 north bastion

11 gate Podesta

11p Galactic Pole; Podesta Road /10 June Road (limb joint)

13 north-east bastion with a belvedere wall (heart)

14 half-bastion (13c?) at the station

15 east bastion, near St Morricela?

15g Gate; Gate St Luzzaro.

The east-west latitude places polar and solstice markers in Cancer-Capricornus, thus spring in Age Aries, contemporary with Etruscan culture. All cities express the standard five subconscious layers of stoneprint. Piacenza does so twice, as the liver map does, not due to any special properties of sheep livers, or the Etruscan pantheon, or local architecture.

Paris central area map (after Parismap360. Archetypal labels and axial grid by ED Furter).

Paris stoneprint tour point by point

The French capital’s historic and spiritual womb is in Notre Dame de Paris cathedral, on City Island in the Seine. Its military and cultural heart is adjacent, in the Louvre on the interior bank. All its notable public, monumental, memorial and symbolic buildings, including the main entrance to its underworld of catacombs in stone quarries, are on its stoneprint, which was more or less fixed in the Middle Ages (see a map of earlier Roman Paris below). Railway stations do not seem to form part of the stoneprint structure in the cities tested up to late 2017. Visitors could start a typological tour at any point, ideally exploring features on each axis in turn, either in number sequence, or in the opposite, seasonal direction. The sequence of archetypes in the Paris stoneprint map is (noting archetypal attributes in brackets):

1 Builder; Eiffel Tower (tower, builder. See Tarot trump 1, Tower. See 1 in Rome, and in London)

2 Builder; Large Palace and Small Palace exhibition and museum complex (cluster). Four statue groups on the facade have twisted postures (twisting). And Concorde Square, with the Luxor obelisk (tower). Former guillotine site.

2c Basket; Triumphal Arch for the Austerlitz Battle, and Unknown Soldier’s tomb (mystery); Champs Elysees on the solar angle of a revolution date (secret or revelation. Astronomy observation points are never on the subconscious grid, see Stonehenge, and Magdalenburg). And Place Vendome with Napoleon’s spiralled column (bent neck) also for the Austerlitz Battle. And Magdalene church; she caught Christ’s blood in a cup (container), has long body hair (Medusa monster), placed a basket (container) of eggs (moons, of adjacent 3) below the cross, lived in a cave (of adjacent 2); and the crypt (cave) for weekday masses; Ten Commandments (revelation) on her doors. Former Napoleonic Army monument, formerly thrice re-planned, former synagogue. Furter out lies La Defence, including a cubic arch (typical of 2) and the Phare tower resembling a woven grain store basket (Basket, weave).

3 Queen; St Augustine church; and statue of Joan of Arc (see Tarot trump 3, Empress)

4 King; Opera Garnier, two Pegasus statues (decan Pegasus). The ceiling painting by Marc Chagall expresses a visual stoneprint. And Masonic lodge Grand Orient.

4 King B; Trinity church; and Masonic Grand Lodge.

5a Priest; Montmartre cemetery (of its opposite 12/13, death)

5b Priest; Basilica Sacred Heart (of its opposite 12/13), large 475m sq mosaic (varicoloured) of Christ in Glory (ascension; see Tarot trump 21, World, as a master ascended in microcosmic halo), large bell (large), equestrian statues (5 or 4 are sometimes equid). And Notre Dame de Clignacourt.

6 Exile; Zenith pop arena (music is typical of Pan, the god of type 6. His statue is on the adjacent 7 axis), far from the centre (egress), between science and music buildings (double-headed), on Canal Ourcq, in Villette Park (tree).

5c BasketTail; Ganesha, elephant temple on Rue Pajol.

7 Child; Buttes-Chaumont outcrop (more typical of 8/9). Former execution site, abattoir, dump, sewage basin, now clean. Pan’s statue belongs in Villette Park (see 6). Pierro De Cosimo’s painting of satyrs harvesting honey between a city and a butte (Mindprint p52-53) may be set at Solutre butt, where Stone Age hunters stampeded horses, but the scene of nature-culture interface is also expressed in this park.

7g Galactic Centre; Buttes-Chaumont park cavern springs, waterfall, pool (water).

8 Healer; Buttes-Chaumont Park Bolivar gate and Brigadier pavilion (pillars).

9 Healer; Belleville Park, hill with health springs (healers), formerly religious communities. Former Mardi Gras site on Fat Tuesday in February, before the fast.

9c BasketLid; Pere Lachaise cemetery of the famous, and execution wall. And former Templar Temple, south of Republic Square; and St Martin; and St Nicholas.

10 Teacher; Bastille Square; Liberty genie of the 1830 three-day revolution, arms in W-posture, holding a wreath (decan Corona), on a ball (wheel), with a torch (more typical of 9). Former fountain of Isis with arms in overlapping VV-posture, below her breasts, spouting water. And Square Vosges /National /Royal jousting track, where Henry2 died from a lance splint in his eye (as Nostradamus may have predicted) while celebrating a peace treaty with Spain (diplomacy). Henry4 rebuilt the track for mounted games and processions, named carousels (see an antelope carousel in the Egyptian Hierakonpolis tomb 100 mural, in Mindprint p220-221, and in a USA rock art work, in Expression 10). Prototype of townhouse squares. Former statue of Louis14 holding a staff, crowned (decan Corona) by Fame (his current statue is on a horse). Napoleon planned a replica of Egypt’s Dendera temple of Hathor, Mother of Horus (decan Bootes is the adult Horus) for a general killed in Egypt. And Hotel Force prison. And Victories Square, winged Victory with arms up, holding two wreaths (decan Corona, Crown). To the south is the remaining tower of St Jaques, who remains on top holding a staff.

11 Womb; Notre Dame de Paris, of Mary (womb). Its facades include several stoneprints (Mindprint p195). Its floor axis lies 25 degrees south-east, to sunrise on two feast days, and perhaps the heliacal rising of Sirius (later paralleled in the Louvre fort and Champs Elysees). Site of former temples on City island (womb). And Salpetiere (Salt) hospital, former gunpowder factory, insane hospital, and prison for 300 prostitutes (womb).

11 Womb B; Roman stadium, concentric (womb); and St Etienne du Mont, of Mary (womb), later of John, with relics of St Genevieve (Kin-wife, Guinevere, womb), patron of Paris, god-daughter of Lutetia (City of Light), carried in procession to Notre Dame (see 11) to cure rye fungus ergotism (decan Spica, Wheat ear). And first Gaul settlement (womb). And Palace of Justice (see Tarot trump 11).

11p Galactic Pole; City Island’s north bridge (limb joint).

12 Heart; Paris Pantheon, round dome on a hill (heart), formerly St Genevieve (see 11B). And French College. And St Michael Square, archangel over a devil or Death inverted (inversion), over a leonine dragon (feline). A City Island western tip, oldest bridge in Paris; statue of playboy king Henry4 on a horse (equid).

12 Heart B; Paris meridian (north-south ‘zero’ line) or ‘heart’, set by the observatory just north-east of Denfer Square. It does not run over the subconscious centre of the city, nor of the subconscious centre of the gates (conscious survey features never do, see Stonehenge). The first meridian monument, with a hole at the top (see Gobekli) was moved south to Montsouris park, or Mont Ysore, after a legendary defeated giant. Several nearby features were named ‘Ysore’s Tomb’ (death), near the Roman cemetery. The railway was formerly inside the fortifications (platform). Former Revolution statue (weapon, death), melted by German occupiers, replaced by Peace Armed (weapon) moved from d’Anvers Square. Five statues: A Lion’s Death (feline, Death, here three men carrying a dead lion, by Edmond Desca, 1929); Desert Drama, of lion versus python (decans Leo over Hydra, feline) with dead cubs (death); Mine Accident (underground, death); Col Flatters and company massacred by Tuaregs in Algeria (weapon, death); Gen Jose de San Martin, liberator of southern South America (weapon). Lake and cascade (water works).

13 Heart; Denfer Rochereau Square, nicknamed ‘Hell’ after some catacombs caved in; a military lion statue (feline. See lion-headed underworld foundation pegs under Gobekli, and the Babylonian chapter). Near the catacombs main entrance (Death). And Luxembourg gardens, Liberty statue, model for the gift to New York (Delacroix, whose own statue is also here, painted Liberty to expresses the heart and womb, see Mindprint p219); several lion statues (feline), and Diana with a bow (weapon). And St Sulpice, with an obelisk for timekeeping (its ‘meridian’ is a few hundred metres west of the Paris meridian); fountain with four lions (feline). And St Germaine des Pres abbey, former Roman temple site. And the Louvre (Window) southern bastion at the river (water works), a former fort (weapon, bastion); and Louvre interior, heart of Paris and France (heart). And Royal Palace (feline).

13 Heart B; Louvre glass pyramid skylight, upward and inverted (inversion) in the roof platform (see 12/13 in Rome, and several Mexican pyramid fields). Three former plans had proposed a pyramid here. Axes 11 and 12/13 impose their themes of birth, death, weapons and tunnels on many cities, on Paris in particular.

13c BasketHead; Miraculous Conception Medal chapel in Bac Street, where St Vincent’s heart (adjacent type 13) and Mary appeared to St Zoe (Life). or Catherine Laboure, buried here. The medal reverse has a +cross with a baseline interwoven (the cistas are often woven) in the top of a letter M, over two flaming hearts, one in a crown of thorns, one pierced by a sword (see cross and lion under Axum).

14 Mixer; Unesco office, Y-shaped (a rare attribute of 14, see Narmer’s chisel); and Military School. And former Tuileries palace, now a statue of a lion mauling a crocodile (decan Hydra). And Invalides (Veterans) chapel dome, tomb of Napoleon and others, statue of Napoleon as summer sun (polar) between two women holding palm branches (calendar or Time devices in Egypt, as of Seshat; see Tarot trump 14, Temperance, Angel of Time).

15 Maker; National Assembly or Parliament (sceptre or mace)

15g Gate; Champ de Mars (path or crossing, as a ’limb joint’).

Many city maps are slightly inaccurate due to exaggerating the width of streets and public squares. Some features of types 6, 7, 8 and 9 are not marked on the map. Further testing may reveal an inner periphery of these types, thus two expressions on the same axis, as found at types 10, 11, 12 and 13.

The ecliptic pole or axial centre is west of the old National Library. Several celestial polar markers are possible. The east-west cardinal direction may place summer in Taurus, thus spring and the cultural time-frame in Age Aquarius, confirmed by the unusual top central position of types 5 Priest. Prophetic time-frames are rare, usually in works that seek to perpetuate a culture, or human culture. The Louvre and the Museum of Man are among several sustained efforts to practice, curate and study culture in this perpetually renovated city.

The general themes in the Paris gates imprint are types 12/13 Heart and 11 Womb (see 11, 11B, 12, 12B, 13 above), typical of interior spaces, protection, nurture, gestation, as well as defence, death and transformation. The two themes combined express what many capitals strive to be: protected yet open, nurturing yet enterprising. Some feminine features are on the Leo axes (such as the Roman Isis site at St Germaine; and statues of famous women in Luxembourg park), while some Heart features are on the 11 Womb axes (such as the lions statue group in the Botanical garden; however type 11 has some minor felid features). Roman Paris had its forum and temples in the Sorbonne area, between axes 12/13, and a Jupiter temple on the Notre Dame site; thus a smaller stoneprint, probably also dominated by types 11 and 12/13.

All five layers of structural expression are subconscious to artists, architects, builders and members of any culture.

See the larger stoneprint formed by the 45 gates of Paris below. Its axial centre is in a different place, as in the two grids of Rome, Brescia, and other walled cities.

Photo guide to the Paris stoneprint

Paris type 2 Builder; Concorde Place obelisk. And Petit Palace Seasons and Elements (twisting); and Louvre museum Medusa mask (decan Medusa).

Paris type 3 Queen; Joan of Arc (a kind of empress) at St Augustine. Other types 3 Aries include Napoleon column with spiral (bent neck).

Paris types 2c, 2c, 4, 5, 6, 6

Paris types 2c Cista; St Magdalene’s cruet (container); Commandments doors (revelation). Type 4 King; Garnier opera Apollo (Sun); (and Pegasus, of decan Pegasus).
Type 5b Priest; Sacred Heart’s Christ in Majesty (World, or Transformed Soul).
Type 6 Exile; Zenith music (Pan) hall, in a park (Pan), logo of double cross (double-headed); and Pan (who is misplaced in the adjacent Buttes Chaumont park).

Paris types 8, 8, 10, 10, 10, 10.

Paris types 8 Healer; Buttes Chaumont park outcrop (pillars) and springs (healing); Statue of Adamastor or Green Man (with a pillar, bent forward, strength feat).
Type 10 Teacher; Bastille Square Liberty (arms up) with crown (decan Corona); Liberty pillar; former Isis statue (arms W-posture, and minister with arms up); and Vosges square former carousel (wheel).

Paris types 11 Womb.

Paris types 11 Womb; Notre Dame (womb) cathedral; with many reliefs and statues of Mary (womb). Salpetiere gunpowder factory, asylum, and prison for prostitutes (womb).
Types 11 Womb B; Roman arena; St Genevieve (Kin-Wife, womb); Justice Palace with statues of virtues (Justice, see Tarot trump 11, Justice).

Paris types 12 Heart and 13 Hearet.

Paris types 12 heart; Masks of Death (death) on island bridge bastions (bastion); Michael Square, St Michael on a devil inverted, over griffin lion (felid); Pantheon (dome).

Paris types 13 Heart; Louvre pyramid on a platform (platform), paired with an inverted pyramid (inversion); Luxembourg garden lion (felid) and Diana hunting (weapon);

Paris types 13 Heart.

Paris types 13 Heart; Luxembourg garden lion (felid); Denfer Rocehreau square lion (felid) over catacombs (platform, death); Montsouris park Dead Lion (death, felid); Lion versus Python (felid, death); Armed Peace (weapon); Meridian marker (heart); St Sulpice fountain lions (felid).

Paris types 14 Mixer.

Paris type 13c BasketHead; Miraculous Conception Medal (weave).

Paris types 14 Mixer; Unesco building (Y-shape); Tuileries lion versus crocodile (decan Leo Minor over decan Hydra); former Hercules versus Hydra (decan Hydra); Invalides veterans home, Napoleon as sun (polar) with two Time angels (Temperance).

Paris types 15 Maaker.

Paris types 15 Maker: National Assembly (sceptre, order, creation), fronted by Law (order, creation) with the hand of justice (smiting) sceptre (sceptre); Facade of virtues, including Strength with a club (sceptre, smiting), a throne with armrests of thunderbolts (sceptres, creation), and a wand of order (sceptre); Heritage Colonnade including a sculptor chiselling (smiting) a large face (face), and Prometheus as creator (creation) with a small club (sceptre).

Paris coat of arms expresses elements of type 15 Maker.

The Paris coat of arms includes a trade ship, subconsciously expressing type 15 Maker decan Argo, in the southern or underworld galactic river; framed by ropes (rope), between two women (doubled), in drapes (decan Argo Vela, Sail). The Seine enters Paris at gate 11 Womb, and exits at gate 15g Gate.

Paris gates (after Geoatlas 2006. Stoneprint labels and axial grid by ED Furter). There is usually only one central option where the maximum number of axes between pairs of opposites could cross. The large number of gates make this sequence of identification, and its axial grid, less secure than the average grid among public and historic features, of about sixteen to thirty points.

The 45 gates of Paris form another, larger stoneprint

In its last wall, Paris has about 45 tax gates, of which 35 are on an axial grid. The usual exceptions at types 12/13 Heart and 11 Womb, which are always on different features (typically bastions, platforms, gardens or waterways), explain four of the exceptions in the southern wall. Where more than sixteen types are expressed in one ragged oval (here unusually regular), the four double types are tripled or quadrupled; and single types are doubled (here some are tripled). The half-types are all expressed, as usual on complex building sites: 2c Basket on Gate Maillot, 5c BasketTail on Ourcq canal, 9c BasketLid on District Twelve gardens, and 13c BasketHead on Gate Plaine). However the c-types are not always on the grid, thus the grid points may be additional types instead. Six gates are unaccountably off the grid (notably type 9 Healer, two types 8 Healer, and one of the types 7 Child, all in the eastern wall). One of the four types 15 Maker is on the ‘annexed’ sports park, instead of a gate. Former gates in the older, smaller city, expressed a simpler outer stoneprint, however medieval maps are usually inaccurate.

Polar markers within the gates, have the same orientation as polar markers within the cycle of major buildings. Type 11p Galactic Pole is on Italy Square. Type 4p Galactic South Pole is on Montmartre cemetery. The ecliptic pole or axial centre is on City Island (limb joint), south of the Palace of Justice. Several celestial markers are possible. The current celestial south pole may be on the Hotel Cieu bridge (limb-joint), placing summer in Scorpius, thus spring and the cultural time-frame of the walls in Age Taurus1, before the work as usual (the time-frame of the buildings inside the current city are later, even anticipating the future).

The general theme among the gates could be type 11 Womb, as it is in the city itself. See concentric stoneprints also in the Piacenza liver, Piacenza city, Rome, and elsewhere. All five layers of structural expression are subconscious to artists, architects, builders and members of any culture.

How to find the subconscious structure in a site plan

To find the sequence of archetypes in an artwork or on a site plan, list the peripheral elements that are near the outer edge, with their apparent features, either clockwise or anti-clockwise. Add potential type numbers after the features, to find potential anchor points for the highest number of correspondences with the standard stoneprint sequence (see the list in the Introduction). Try to complete the sequence by researching the characteristics of buildings and features. If the sequence is not confirmed by about half the characters or buildings, try adding type numbers in the opposite direction, or from different starting points.

Test whether axial opposite pairs confirms the sequence, by drawing an axial grid between their eyes of functional centres, such as altars, or entrances, or centres. Draw two or three lines from each feature, to two or three possible opposites, until the axial centre reveals itself by the crossing of five or more axes at one point; then redraw the grid with only the axes that cross at the same point. Most of the pairs of opposites should express the standard cycle of sixteen types, or at least the basic twelve types, as six pairs of opposites. If there are more than four strong contradictions (types opposite the wrong counterpart, or more than four characters off the grid), search for a better axial centre. Identify the borderline half-types; and the four remaining polar points, usually on limb joints. Use the standard caption format to write a structuralist analysis of the building, complex, city or artwork.

Use the standard analysis scoring formula to determine variation from the expected average of 60%. If the score is below 40%, repeat the analysis on a different map, or with other variants. If the score is above 80%, confirm whether each element accounted for, is categorically visible.

See more art analysis examples on www.edmondfurter.wordpress.com

See art analysis examples including peyote, ayahuasca, mushroom, and calendric art, on www.mindprintart.wordpress.com

The stoneprint structuralist analysis format

Cut and paste these labels to identify characters and structural points on a map or artwork image. Pairs of opposites are given above/below one another. Some pairs may remain unused (often the Cistas, or 1-8, or 12-5a). Use question marks for extra figures that do not express a type or border or pole:

1Build 2Build 2cBaskt 3Queen 4King 4p
8Heal 9Heal 9cLid 10Teach 11Womb 11p

 

5aPriest 5bPriest 5cTail 6Exile 7Child 7g
12Heart 13Heart 13cHead 14Mix 15Make 15g

 

cp csp ? ? ?

The same set of labels is used in these and earlier illustrations, but that the format of the labels is now changed by placing the numbers before the mythic name, and replacing constellation mythic names by generic social functions. The format used in illustrations up to December 2016, was ta1, ar3, and so on, which is less intuitive to read. Future illustrations will follow the new format above.

About structuralist anthropology research

In 2016, Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings, and cites, confirmed a new direction in the exploration of our cultural record, of our nature, and of nature. The book takes readers on a journey through all the famous cultural sites of the world, and the intuitive crafts and human sciences, towards integrating the subconscious and conscious paradigms of whom and what we are. The book breaks the bonds that held science and popular culture to fundamental, causal, common-sense explanations of our works, such as ‘development, diffusion, and cultural evolution’. We have always been a super race, with a large capacity for working structural wonders, but with limited self-knowledge. Stoneprint is an indispensable aid to exploring the art, artefacts, tombs and cities of any culture, and opens a new field of enquiry to crafts and human sciences.

* Order Stonerpint Journal editions at $6 plus postage from edmondfurter at gmail dot com, or via http://www.stoneprintjournal.blog.

Back numbers:

1 Pictish beasts ‘zodiac’.

2 Crop circles are natural artworks.

4 Stonerpint tour of London.

5 Culture code in seals and ring stamps. Also from lulu.com.

6 Rennes le Chateau stoneprint tour. Lulu.com $10.

Extracts from the journals will be added to the second edition of Stoneprint (388 pages, 130 illustrations and maps, $30 plus postage).

 

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