Archetypes in modern Hopi and Dogon ritual art

Example of structuralist art analysis, of a Hopi Candle Night ritual scene, and a Dogon painted mud relief mural. Members and students recognise several stock kachina characters, rituals and items, and Dogon myths. But artists, members and students of any culture, could now identify the archetypal features in any artwork by using the axial grid between eyes, and the list of recurrent archetypal features, on which culture is based (Furter 2014, 2016). The characters are not ‘constellations’.

Crop circles are natural artworks

Nature and culture both compulsively, subconsciously express five layers of eternal, archetypal structure that predate creation, and inform perpetual re-creation. Crop circles indicate nature at play. She uses biological shapes, and what we label ‘abstract’ angles and numbers, but they are as basic as space, time and archetypal meaning; what we egotistically label ‘concepts’ and ‘symbols’. Crop circles are lessons in humility.

Gobekli Tepe art is archetype, not a zodiac

A vulture and scorpion among the animals carved on Gobekli Tepe pillar D43, attracted several interpretations as a ‘zodiac’. However no coherent star map, observational record, or zodiac emerged. There is some consensus that four species on two other pillars could be seasonal ‘beasts’. As in artworks worldwide, in all Ages, the design subconsciously expresses the five-layered archetypal structure found in myth, ritual, building sites, calendars, constellations and decans.

Stoneprint book index

Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities (Edmond Furter, 2016, Four Equators Media, 400 pages, 170mm x 295mm, 130 illustrations) resolves the mysteries of correspondences between ancient cultures. The book reveals the core content and ‘grammar’ or ‘DNA’ of culture. We have an innate subconscious compulsion to express a specific, complex, archetypal set of features, in sequence, and on an axial grid, in all our works.