Gobekli Tepe art is archetype, not a zodiac

A vulture and scorpion among the animals carved on Gobekli Tepe pillar D43, attracted several interpretations as a ‘zodiac’. However no coherent star map, observational record, or zodiac sequence emerged. There is some consensus that four species on two other Gobekli pillars could be seasonal ‘beasts’ or cardinal points. As in artworks worldwide, in all Ages, the design subconsciously expresses the five layers of archetypal structure, also found in myth, ritual, building sites, calendars, constellations and hour decan asterisms.

Stoneprint book index

Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities (Edmond Furter, 2016, Four Equators Media, 400 pages, 170mm x 295mm, 130 illustrations) resolves the mysteries of correspondences between ancient cultures. The book reveals the core content and ‘grammar’ or ‘DNA’ of culture. We have an innate subconscious compulsion to express a specific, complex, archetypal set of features, in sequence, and on an axial grid, in all our works.

Nazca plain geoglyphs speak structural grammar

Criss-crossing trapezium lines form a kind of ‘forest’ over the core area of the Nazca geoglyphs. The character figures are in continuous-line format, indicating a well-developed style, perhaps based on textile weaving crafts, or to enable processions. Their ecological themes speak of climate change. Here is the peripheral sequence of characters in the Nazca core area is (noting archetypal features).

Psychological motivations express archetypes

The study of archetypal expression on a worldwide scale became possible in the last two decades, thanks to access to rock art reproductions in academic papers, field work, archives; and plans of buildings, temples, ruins, complexes, pyramid fields, geoglyphs and cities of every culture and era, posted on the Internet. Demonstration of stoneprint in these two media, raises the possibility that more features of the culture code could be discovered in more media, such as literature and personality.