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StoneprintJournal.blog

Structuralist anthropology blog by Edmond Furter

Marc Alexander’s ‘Prophetic’ art meditates gloom

A sense of immanent doom was palpable in popular culture understatements of the 2001 9/11 terror attacks; 2012 Mayan Long Count zero; global financial crisis; Arab Spring waves; pollution; and Age Aquarius (since 2016). The 2019 autumn mass protests (assembly, archetype 5) worldwide, for freedom and environment, against ‘extinction’ (5v13), herald the Age of science, ritual, administration, hyperactivity, global friendship and political standards. Marc Alexander’s death and oracles collage subconsciously expresses the archetypal structure in unusually dense detail. This post includes a guide to how to identify archetypal features in cultural media.

Rennes le Chateau’s archetypal sphere

Rennes le Chateau archetypal landscape includes Couiza. It is as complex as in the earlier, adjacent Bains. At Rennes the eternal structure is now identified in subconscious expressions at several levels of scale: in the church domain; church floor plan; and church mural statue group (see other posts). The same applies to cities, including Paris and London (Stoneprint Journals 3, 4). Priest Berenger Sauniere, like Boudet in neighbouring Bains, unknowingly served the global, subconscious agenda of all cultures, each in different styling.

Rennes les Bains ‘Celtic’ circle stoneprint tour

Around Rennes les Bains valley is a ragged oval of higher sites, each characterised by nature, history, buildings and legend, as Bains priest Henri Boudet (1886) noted in puns and riddles. This ‘equator’ of sites makes the Sals basin a concave, lower sphere of waters ‘under the earth’, next to the plateau and knoll of Rennes le Chateau as an upper sphere. The Bains stoneprint diameter is about 3x4km, similar to Jerusalem, Rome, London, Paris and other building sites, but rural.

Rennes le Chateau stoneprint tour of archetype in art, church plans, and villages

In the hothouse of culture and legends at Rennes les Bains and Rennes le Chateau, the eternal archetypal structure is camouflaged in an unusually wide range of styling. The structuralist anthropology model of optional recurrent features is identified at several levels of scale. Here is an introduction to Stoneprint Journal 6, and a map of the five points where the subconscious patterns in the two adjacent landscapes converge.

Archetypes in modern Hopi and Dogon ritual art

Example of structuralist art analysis, of a Hopi Candle Night ritual scene, and a Dogon painted mud relief mural. Members and students recognise several stock kachina characters, rituals and items, and Dogon myths. But artists, members and students of any culture, could now identify the archetypal features in any artwork by using the axial grid between eyes, and the list of recurrent archetypal features, on which culture is based (Furter 2014, 2016). The characters are not 'constellations'.

A Greek salt ‘frying’ pan model of character and calendar

Greek Cycladic islands salt evaporation pan bases often traced out planetary calendars. One terracotta pan bottom incidentally expresses the archetypal cycle of sixteen types in a rare axial grid. The rare design compares well with Egyptian polar decans (see another post on the Seti1 ceiling), but due to archetype, not diffusion.

The Parliament Square statues stoneprint

Parliament Square lies on one of London's subconscious axes, and has its own smaller scale stoneprint cycle of features, with their focal points on a smaller subconscious but measurable axial grid, as in all complex built sites. Eleven statues of democratic leaders, express two thirds of a small but dense stoneprint cycle emerging here, probably awaiting five more iconic characters (on the blank axial lines on the map).

The stoneprint map of London

Most major symbolic sites in London lie along invisible axial lines. To maintain a sense of sequence, readers may tour chosen sites on each axis, outward or inward in turn; or combine a tour of chosen sites on adjacent axes.

The stoneprint tour of Paris

Social groups always re-express a specific structure in every complex building site, including villages, temple fields, campuses and cities. Known elements of the archetypal structure of culture include some of their characteristic features; their peripheral sequence; and spacing of communal... Continue Reading →

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