The stoneprint map of London

Map of London (after Mapaplan. Typological labels and axial grid by ED Furter). Each axis has several features, listed in a photo tour of nine pages in Stoneprint Journal 4 print edition.

The main archetypal sites in London are: 1 Tower; 2 Southwark Cathedral; 2B New City Court; 3c Finch’s Grotto; 3 South Bank University; 3B Elephant & Castle north; 3BB Elephant &Castle south; 3BBB St George’s Cathedral; 4 War Museum; 4B Chandler’s Hall; 4BB Archbishop’s Park; 4BBB Lambton Palace; 4p Former County Hall; 5:20 Parliament; 5:20B Westminster Abbey east; 5:20BB Parliament Square; 5:21 Westminster Cathedral; 5:21B Passport Office; 6 Wellington Barracks; 7 Buckingham Palace; 7B Horse Guards Parade; 7g St James’ Palace, and Green Park; 8 Duke of York’s column; 8B Admiralty Arch; 9 Nelson’s Column; 9B Mankind Museum; 10c Palladium; 10 St Paul (church); 10B British Library; 10BB British Museum west, and Royal Opera east; 10BBB British Museum east, and St George Bloomsbury; 11 Freemason’s Hall; 11B John Soane Museum; 11BB Lincoln Inn Hall, and St Clement Danes; 11BBB Royal Courts of Justice; 11p Temple Church; 12 Smithfield Market; 12B St Bartholomew, and St Bride; 12BB Barbican; 13 London Museum; 13B St Paul’s Cathedral; 14 St Mary le Bow; 15 Financial Centre, and Stock Exchange; 15B Synagogue, ‘Gherkin’, and St Mary Woolnoth; 15g Great Fire Monument, and Tower Gateway.

Each axis has several more features,  listed with a large map and some site photographs in Stoneprint Journal 4, print edition.

This edition is available worldwide from (24 pages, $18). Students and lovers of art and rock art should consider ordering it with the book Mindprint (264 pages, 200 illustrations, about $29).

Below are some extracts from the list, and from an article on archetypes and their systematic labelling.

The stoneprint tour of London

Most major symbolic sites in London lie along invisible axial lines. To maintain a sense of sequence, readers may tour chosen sites on each axis, outward or inward in turn; or combine a tour of chosen sites on adjacent axes.

Taurean towers on London Bridge

Combine the tour sites on axes 1 and 1B, outward.

[]1 Taurus; London Bridge. A Roman wooden pier was found nearby. The Norse saga Heimskringla boats that Olaf2 (sacker) ruined the bridge against Cnut (builder) in 1014. The Fish Str version of 1209 carried houses (cluster), like swallow nests (see Swift People in rock art. Mindprint p108-109). Executed heads were displayed on pikes. The nursery rhyme ‘London bridge is falling down’ expresses type 1:16 Taurus Auriga, in the galaxy (tower or bridge, unstable. See Tarot trump 16, Tower or lighthouse struck by lightning). Adjacent type 15g Gate is often a bridge (see alchemical emblems and verses, such as Basil Valentine).

The rhyme is about tolls, corruption and fate. Five of the nineteen arches collapsed in the reign of Henry3, 1282, after he gave toll money of 1269-1281 to Queen Eleanor of Provence, ‘my fair lady’ in the song. London took back bridge tolling and formed Bridge House Estates, building road arches, at right angles to water arches below. This ‘bobbing and weaving’ (twisting) pattern may have prompted the local version of the archetypal game, also known in Paris in the 1400s. The Thames tributary river Lea, at Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire, has a human sacrifice burial, another model for the universal game of catching a player under an arch of arms at the last word of a rhyme. Some houses burned in 1633. All were removed in the 1700s, perhaps prompting the ‘falling down’ lyric, as in Tommy Thumb’s Pretty Song Book of 1744. The bridge moved (sacking) upriver in 1763-1831 to King William /Gracechurch Str, boosting new development (building). This version was moved brick by brick to Lake Havasu City, Arizona by a developer (sack and build) in 1971. Germany had a similar rhyme of Magdeburger Bridge (Mighty Fortress, as Hebrew Migdal, tower or podium). Protestant Magdeburg was sacked in a Thirty Years’ War massacre in 1631. Many rhymes have religious undertones.

[]1 Taurus; Old Billingsgate Market (legendary tower. See Great Fire Monument and Belin, on the pack page).

[]1 Taurus; Tower of London, at Legge’s Mount, and Tower Gardens (see p1 and p3. The Tower has three stoneprints of its own, a subconscious maze). A port, fort, prison (cluster), passage (cave, as at Wakefield Tower), bastion (tower. See Tarot trump 16, Tower. Type 1 Taurus Orion’s higher magnitude is 16 Taurus Auriga, including the galactic ‘river’). Its chapel is of St John, bull (bovid) among the evangelists. While Greenwich Observatory was being built, science ‘cabal’ members Moore, Halley, Streete and Hooke met in Flamsteed’s temporary observatory in the White Tower’s Bell Tower turret to observe a lunar eclipse on 1 January 1675, using Hooke’s spring watch and Flamsteed’s almanac and telescopes (instruments. See trump 1, Juggler with instruments on a table. See trump 1:16, Tower with two angels and instruments in the air).

…… etc

Arian St George and dragon

[]3BBB Aries; St George’s Cathedral (decans Triangulum and Cetus tail, sacrifice and dragons). Catholic, Metropolitan (bishopric). Cross of murdered El Salvador bishop Romero (sacrifice) 2013. (Opposite 10BBB, St George Bloomsbury. Near 3c St George).


Geminian churns at the ‘Gherkin’

[]15B Gemini; Synagogue, Bevis Marks Str. Sephardic, Spain and Portugal, 1701.

[]15B Gemini; ‘Gherkin’ tower, Swiss re-insurers, spiral texture (churn), 2004. Former Baltic Exchange, 30 St Mary Axe Rd (formerly Threadneedle Str). Irish bomb 1992 (Baltic moved to nu28). Fitzwilliam House site was Sts Mary and Ursula (Bear, decan Ursa Minor of Gemini), of Skinners Guild (bag, mace. See axes on their arms, and an Inn sign); levelled 1561, merged with St Andrew.

[]15B Gemini; St Andrew, Undershaft, 1100s?; 1300s; 1532. Merged with 15-15B St Helen’s Bishopsgate. Andrew (his name means ‘Manly’) was Peter’s brother (doubled). Crucified on an X-cross (churn), as on Scotland’s flag.

[]15B Gemini; St Mary, Woolnoth, Lombard Str, 1700s. Spiral altar (churn).

[]15B London Stone stump (churn post), Cannon Str, on Coronation Procession. Was fixed with iron bars (chains, ropes). (Was at 15B-15g Watergate). Under Richard2, pretender Jack Cade struck his sword on it (mace). Its top was cut off and moved 15B-15g Cannon Str 111 in 1742. Moved to 13 London Museum 2016. A stone pagoda and podium (churn) remains here. Perhaps from entrance of governor (re-creator) Agricola, AD 80.

……etc. The guide includes nine pages.

Gate churns at East Smithfield

[]15g Great Fire Monument. See a separate post on Formerly St Margaret.

[]15g Tower Gateway hub (gate).

[]15g East Smithfield, former Knights’ Guild outside the wall. Thirteen knights asked the field from King Edgar, 960s, to combat “above ground, below ground, and in water (churn), and on a certain day (midsummer, sun in Gemini constellation) jostle in contest. The Book of Trinity notes they “threw spears” (surveyed borders) from Dodding Pond Str (pool) to the Thames; St Katherine Hospital; mills (churns, built later); the wall; and new Tower ditch (pool, order). Heirs were confirmed by Edward Confessor, and William Rufus. Henry1’s queen Matilda founded Holy Trinity (churn), Aldgate 1115. The Tower Constable kept his vineyard. Queen Matilda of Stephen founded 1 St Katherine Hospital 1148. Eleanor of Henry3, and Philippa of Edward3, bestowed parts. A Pentecost fair from 1229 (50 days after Easter, harvest in June, sun in Gemini-Taurus gate). Jews settled for protection by the Tower 1236 (but expelled 1290). Two Black Death cemeteries (1 pit) 1347-1351. Lord Chancellor’s ward from 1442, a kind of ‘DC’ (juncture). Monasteries were dissolved 1531, the hospital became Protestant, houses given to nobles. Property of 1 Tower since 1686.


The London stoneprint axial centre is on the Waterloo Bridge south bank, near the Queen Elizabeth Theatre and Purcell Room. An architecture competition installation named Room for London stood on the roof 2012-2016. The National Film Theatre’s three-reel projector logo incidentally expresses the archetypal polar trio.



The London Stoneprint’s axial centre is on Waterloo Bridge south bank, seen here from the former Room for London, modelled on Joseph Conrad’s houseboat in the Congo, featured in his novel Heart of Darkness. The boat, and the installation model, was named King of Belgium, a legacy of colonisation. London’s third wave of westward expansion, that moved its axial centre to the south bank, was partly due to colonisation.

London’s polar triangles

The axial centre or ‘ecliptic pole’ is on Waterloo bridge south bank (juncture), between the National Film Theatre with a three-reel projector logo (polar trio); Queen Elizabeth Hall; Purcell Room; former rooftop Room for London 2012-2016 as the Congo riverboat of Joseph Conrad, and in his novel Heart of Darkness; and the National Movies Museum.

The ‘celestial pole’ had moved from the river bank (juncture) at Bernie Garden, to bear pits (decan Ursa); to a former power station; to the Oxo Tower; to the Jubilee Garden north; to Upper Ground Str at South Bank TV; to a junction near the Movies Museum.

The ‘celestial south pole’ had moved from the Thames inner bend (juncture), to the Royal Festival Hall (since the Festival of Britain of 1951); Queen Elizabeth Hall; and Purcell Room.

These markers placed London’s ‘summer’ in Cancer, then Gemini, then Taurus; thus ‘spring’ and the cultural time-frame in Ages Aries, recently Pisces, and now Aquarius (since 2016). Contemporary polar markers are typical of future-oriented sites. London is as timeless as Rome, but consciously transformative.

…… etc

Stoneprint Journal 4 sample page p2
London schematic map of AD 900 with an imaginary expanded wall. The imagined centre was on the Thames bend (juncture), ahead of its time. The subconscious axial centre had moved to the south bank of Waterloo Bridge (juncture) in the Renaissance.
Stoneprint model of the archetypal structure in nature and culture.

Archetypes live in myths, months, saints, constellations, trumps, numbers and buildings

Petrarch’s poem cycle of seasonal ‘triumphs’ expressed archetypes in emblematic verses in 1340-1374. Various illustrators added drawings of popular calendric, mythical, astrological and stereotypical characters in procession. These books were probably models for the 22 Tarot ‘trumps’. Their archetypal meanings were identified in a list of recurrent features in artworks (Mindprint, 2014) and building sites (Stoneprint, 2016). Similar characters appear in rituals and pantheons, as angels, saints or legends. Artists and builders always express them in their fixed sequence, and with their eyes or focal features on an axial grid. Among the best known sets of emblems are heraldry (see Stoneprint Journal 1; Pictish beasts) and various card decks of courts, vocations, ‘chaps’ or constellations. Stoneprint labels could use any of these sets. For ease of sorting and listing, labels used in images and text start with typological numbers, identical to the Tarot trump sequence based on Petrarch (Moakley 1956). There were variant totals and sequences of ‘triumphs’ and trumps, from which the Marseilles deck, in its Milan variant, became popular in the 1300s. Golden Dawn founder SL Mathers and his wife Moina drafted a Cabalistic version in England in the 1700s. Mathers swopped two numbers to fit his system of correspondences; 11 Strength and 8 Justice of Milan, became 8 Strength and 11 Justice in England. His deck was copied by AE Waite and Pamela Smith, published by Rider in 1910. The Rider-Waite deck became popular due to adding pictures to the court and suite cards. Resolution of seasonal and astrological correspondences with the trumps (Furter 2014) demonstrated that Mathers’s swop was a subconscious correction to an error in the Milan variant.

STONEPRINT Journal series

This post is an extract from a colour supplement to Stoneprint, the human code in art, buildings and cities. To order the book Stoneprint (2016), or Mindprint (2014), or Stoneprint Journal editions or volumes; or slide show talks; or to contribute articles, email edmondfurter at gmail dot com. or call +27 (0)11 955 6732. Four Equators Media, Johannesburg. ISBN 978-0-620-69863-4

See other extracts on these websites:

Back editions:

1 Pictish beasts ‘zodiac’, price E12

2 Crop circles are natural artworks, price E12

3 The stoneprint tour of Paris, price E12

4 The stoneprint tour of London. This edition is available worldwide from (24 pages, $18). Students and lovers of art and rock art should consider ordering it with the book Mindprint (265 pages, 200 illustrations, about $29).

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